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brauneyz
12-04-2010, 08:27 PM
... other than football news that is?

We've discussed TV, movies, music and recipes, so why not books (safer than politics and religion)? Fiction or not, your choice.

I'll start. Presently I'm starting Nelson DeMille's The Lion, the new sequel to Lion's Game. Having read just about everything else he's ever written, I'm assured this one will be a winner.

I tend to get hooked on authors and devour them, so in addition to DeMille, I love ...
John LesCroart
Greg Isles
James Patterson
Patricia Cornwell
Jonathan Kellerman
... for starters

Non-fiction: Anything combining psych and biology (evolutionary psychology) written by Steven Pinker or Richards Dawkins and their contemporaries. Thomas Sowell for economics and some politics.

Next on my list: Jeffrey Miron's Libertarianism from A to Z and Andrew Napolitano's Lies the Government Told You.

How 'bout you...?

msclemons
12-04-2010, 09:28 PM
I read mostly sci-fi/fantasy.

Steven Brust
L.E. Modesitt
Orson Scott Card
Brian Sandersen
Robin Hobb

etc. etc. Got 6 book shelves overflowing with paperbacks. My wife keeps threatening to use them for kindling if I don't clean them up.

Andy Freeland
12-04-2010, 10:08 PM
I'm not much of a reader. I'm halfway through my 2nd or 3rd book this year, which is about average. I tend to read lightweight, humorous books where there's little or no chance I might accidentally learn something. Last couple have been John Irving.

brauneyz
12-04-2010, 10:21 PM
Last couple have been John Irving.

Twisted River? Also on my list to finish. Read a couple chapters, but had to return it to the library because I was traveling or something. I love libraries!


I tend to read lightweight, humorous books where there's little or no chance I might accidentally learn something.

You can't beat Dave Barry then. Well, except you might actually learn something. Dude is funny, and wise.

Clem, as much as I adored all the Star Trek movies and series, I never got into reading much sci-fi. A little Heinlein, but it's been awhile.

msclemons
12-04-2010, 10:37 PM
Clem, as much as I adored all the Star Trek movies and series, I never got into reading much sci-fi. A little Heinlein, but it's been awhile.

Try Orson Scott Card sometime. He does character novels thinly disguised as sci-fi. Also, Dave Barry is awesome. Mike Royko was also good in a similar vein.

Andy Freeland
12-04-2010, 10:38 PM
Twisted River? Also on my list to finish.

Actually yes. Not as good as I typically expect from Irving, but I'm not that far into it. Finished 'Widow for one year' early this year, highly recommended (though the first half is much better than the 2nd).


You can't beat Dave Barry then. Well, except you might actually learn something. Dude is funny, and wise.

That's not a bad idea, might try that. I know Barry is really funny, mostly from articles. I also saw a documentary on Fran Lebowitz today, reminding me that she's one of the funniest people on earth and I really need to read her books.

You're probably one of those 'I have to have a book in my hands' type people. Not me. I started reading more with the advent of kindle.

brauneyz
12-04-2010, 11:04 PM
I started reading more with the advent of kindle.

Between that and the alcohol consumption, I'm sure your parents are thrilled with their educational investment. :p

Andy Freeland
12-04-2010, 11:30 PM
Between that and the alcohol consumption, I'm sure your parents are thrilled with their educational investment. :p

My parents consider my 6 years at clown college to be their greatest investment.

kotar44
12-05-2010, 12:24 AM
Fiction-I'm into the Lethem and Eggers school of literature lately
Non-fiction-any of the neo-atheists (Harris, Dawkins), Hitchens, and anything on Russian history, particularly Stalin...and of course Chomsky
Not too mention all the poker books I'm constantly re-reading

BuckeyeRidley
12-05-2010, 12:51 AM
I don't get a chance to read much in my spare time. I do read the Bible, sports columns and that's about it.

I have read and enjoyed autobiographies from folks like The Supremes Legend Mary Wilson, Terrell Owens, T-Boz, William Hanna, Joseph Barbera and some others. I have enjoyed reading Suze Orman's money books. Money Knowledge is Power!

StarvinMarvin
12-05-2010, 02:09 AM
Can't much read anymore. There was a time though I'd have 3 books or so going at a time. Clancy was a fave and lots of biographies. Sad the eyes go south as one ages.

mkocs6
12-05-2010, 02:53 AM
I read a lot. But I'm a graduate student, so that's not really fair, because I don't read the same way or for the same reasons other people choose to read.

That said, Brauneyz, put this one on your list: Embers, Sandor Marai. It's pretty short (about 200 pages), but you have to chew your food. You'll have to re-read paragraphs from time to time, but I swear to you, it's one of the greatest books I've ever read, and I've tackled some good ones.

GoBigOrGoHome
12-05-2010, 02:59 AM
... other than football news that is?

We've discussed TV, movies, music and recipes, so why not books (safer than politics and religion)? Fiction or not, your choice.

I'll start. Presently I'm starting Nelson DeMille's The Lion, the new sequel to Lion's Game. Having read just about everything else he's ever written, I'm assured this one will be a winner.

I tend to get hooked on authors and devour them, so in addition to DeMille, I love ...
John LesCroart
Greg Isles
James Patterson
Patricia Cornwell
Jonathan Kellerman
... for starters

Non-fiction: Anything combining psych and biology (evolutionary psychology) written by Steven Pinker or Richards Dawkins and their contemporaries. Thomas Sowell for economics and some politics.

Next on my list: Jeffrey Miron's Libertarianism from A to Z and Andrew Napolitano's Lies the Government Told You.

How 'bout you...?

Add Baladacci, Sandford, Grippando, Palmer, Cook, Montanari, Silva, Flynn....

DeMille is a favorite. John Corey is a great character. I am an audiobook guy and keep hoping they release "Plum Island" in audio format.

I read all the mystery & suspense I can.

I also enjoy some good fictionasl comedy. If you are looking for some intenesely dark, gut-busting humor, "Skinny Dip" by Carl Hiaasen is a must read. Love Elmore Leonard, too.

mkocs6
12-05-2010, 03:21 AM
I don't want to sound like some sort of ivory-towered academic (probably because I am), but I will warn anyone who takes my book suggestions seriously, that they're pretty much going to be the opposite of the lists getting cranked out here. I do not mean to come off snobby; I just want to warn people about what they're going to read (or not read). I'm feeling more inspired, so here is a more complete list. It's good mix, I think, of contemporary fiction while sprinkling in a few classics. You might guess a common theme:

Embers, Sandor Marai
Old School, Tobias Wolff
Atonement, Ian McEwan
A Hero of Our Time, Mikhail Lermontov
A Heartbreaking Work of Staggering Genius, David Eggers
The End of the Affair, Graham Greene
A Very Long Engagement, Sebastian Japrisot
High Fidelity, Nick Hornby
The Master and Margarita, Mikhail Bulgakov
The Blind Assassin, Margaret Atwood

N.B.: I was a History and Russian lit major, and am now a graduate student in History. I tried to name less obvious works (I think most people have heard they should read Anna Karenina and The Brothers Karamazov; if you haven't or haven't taken those people seriously, believe me, you should; but don't read War and Peace; it sucks), but I think some of these names are familiar to most people.

SpartaChris
12-05-2010, 03:59 AM
I read anything by Bob Guccione Jr., Larry Flynt and Hugh Hefner.

ScottDCP
12-05-2010, 09:48 AM
My favorite author is, hands-down, Terry Pratchett. Followed closely by Connie Willis.

I am quite pleased to have discovered two new-to-newish novels by Glen Cook this month - Gilded Latten Bones is a much-needed final stanza to the Garrett Files (Picture Raymond Chandler crossed with Tolkein with a dash of Bob Uecker), as the previous Cruel Zinc Melodies was a bit out of character.

Skinny Dip was the first Hiaasen novel I read, and I consider it a wondrous thing - I have done my best to now read them in chronological order, to best enjoy Skink.

Louis L'Amour can get me through a four hour lull in quite satisfying fashion - I have recently re-read Reilly's Luck with a hopeful eye toward adaptation, and love his short stories (He and Ms. Willis are my favorite American short story writers of the last 100 years, though Charlotte Perkins Gilman wrote the best one I've ever read - The Yellow Wallpaper).

If you're ever holed up for a month, I recommend The Patton Papers - George Patton's wife kept copies of just about everything he ever wrote in her attic, and he was a huge letter-writer and diarist. Some of the writings were distilled for War As I Knew It, which begat the movie. The complete works, as it were, are engrossing on a level that shocked me when I was lucky enough to live in Kalamazoo (which might explain the month with nothing to do). It used to be that I would read anything by Tim Powers, Tad Williams, or Neil Gaiman, but have grown apart from them.

I'll still happily grab anything by MacDonald, Parker, Ludlum, Leonard, or Sandford and have come to enjoy Jim Butcher.

I read voraciously as a child, and have gone in fits and spurts since I stopped getting taller. I've trimmed it a bit (though I still read more than I watch movies, which satisfies me a little bit), but still angle towards narrative fiction with a dash of the fantastical.

BoJack34
12-05-2010, 10:42 AM
I also enjoy Hiassen.

The Song of Ice and Fire series by George RR Martin is outstanding.

Ragar
12-05-2010, 11:24 AM
SCi-fi/fantasy, then followed by some non-fiction, either military or world history. I also like serialized worlds, such as Warhammer's 40k universe. Growing up, the greatest investment was my parent's taking me to a library twice a week, and them buying the World Book encyclopedia, must have read that 4 or 5 times (and not just for science reports). And no, I'm not kidding about the encyclopedia.

ScottDCP
12-05-2010, 11:42 AM
The Song of Ice and Fire series by George RR Martin is outstanding.

I was amazed at the beginning of the story and the presentation and handling of the Eddard Stark character. That really hooked me on these. Any idea when the next one comes?

Polishguy00
12-05-2010, 12:50 PM
Baseball History and biographies. Football History and biographies. Chuck Klosterman. Malcolm Gladwell. Military History Quarterly. George Carlin. Mostly non-fiction now. Used to read a lot of Tom Clancy and Lawrence Sanders.

Recent reads have included:
"Blood, Sweat, and Chalk"- "Tim Layden
"Football Scouting Methods"-Steve Belichik
"In Fifty Years We'll All Be Chicks" Adam Carolla
"The Game From Where I Stand"- Doug Glanville
"When Will Jesus Bring the Pork Chops" George Carlin
"Blink" Malcolm Gladwell
"Sonic Boom"- Gregg Easterbrook

Currently reading:
Jaworski's "Games That Changed the Game."
Ken Dryden's "The Game."
Nick Hornby's "Fever Pitch."

On Deck:
A biography on Satchel Paige
2011 Hardball Times Annual

Pruitt
12-05-2010, 12:51 PM
I am currently loving "Packing For Mars" by Mary Roach which is a very funny book about the grosser side of NASA's research.

BoJack34
12-05-2010, 12:55 PM
I was amazed at the beginning of the story and the presentation and handling of the Eddard Stark character. That really hooked me on these. Any idea when the next one comes?

It keeps getting pushed back. It was supposedly going to be complete as long ago as 2006.

Martin is now assisting with the HBO series coming probably March '11 - hopefully he finds some time to complete the next book soon. There is no firm release date unfortunately.

That HBO series looks pretty good :)

I almost forgot my favorite annual book - the Baseball Forecaster by the boys at baseballhq.com

BoJack34
12-05-2010, 12:59 PM
This thread is great, I will try many of the suggestions here. Even the 'snobby' ones :)

brauneyz
12-05-2010, 01:07 PM
This thread is great, I will try many of the suggestions here. Even the 'snobby' ones :)

I agree. Pleased I overcame my geeky reluctance and started it, though I am waiting for our own dear Kaba to chime in with, "Ma'am, what's a book?" :)

ReaderM
12-05-2010, 02:10 PM
Well seeing as my nick is ReaderM, i think it apporiate to say I read a little bit.. I'll read anything that as long as it is good

Recently on fantasy/Sci-Fi so just finished the lastest Wheel of Time Book: Towers of Midnight and going through the Ender Saga by Orson Scott Card now. A book on my wish list that i hope to read before end of month is Mr.Monster by Daniel Wells, sequel to I'm Not a Serial Killer which was personal fav of mine this year.

Also if anyone on here reads any manga or Foreign Light Novels then that list could go on for a while haha.. though I do recommand the website GoodReads.com for keeping track of the books u have read and see good reviews that other ppl give on books.

msclemons
12-05-2010, 04:11 PM
Wheel of Time series is great. It started in 1985 and is still going. Will be a 30 year saga by the time it's done.

Neil Gaimen is also fantastic. I'd recommend American Gods to anyone. Awesome book.

ReaderM
12-05-2010, 04:34 PM
Wheel of Time series is great. It started in 1985 and is still going. Will be a 30 year saga by the time it's done.

Neil Gaimen is also fantastic. I'd recommend American Gods to anyone. Awesome book.

Best part is that even though original author has passed on, the person who is finishing up the series has done an excellent job of following not only the Robert Jordan's notes but also stuck to overall story while adding his own sense of style.

Amy
12-06-2010, 09:31 AM
I just finished 'War' by Sebastian Junger. He's a reporter who was imbedded with a company of the 173rd Airborne in Afghanistan and spent most of the 15 month tour over there with them. Great read.

I just started 'Not for Ourselves Alone: The Story of Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Susan B. Anthony' by Geoffrey Ward and Ken Burns.

Wordsworth
12-06-2010, 12:57 PM
I've been on a big Cormac McCarthy kick lately. I've read The Road, which blew me away, Child of God, and am almost done reading part 1 of the Border Trilogy, All The Pretty Horses. He does not use punctuation and grammar like most writers, but his prose is so eerie and hypnotizing that I could read pretty much anything of his. I'm excited to get to No Country For Old Men after this trilogy.

I recently bought some old Ian Fleming books from the James Bond series. I read Casino Royale, which was excellent. It's the first book, but the way it jumps directly into the story it's as if you're glimpsing into the life of this international spy who was already been around a long time. There's no introductions, no explanations, just immediate story. Great, short read. I have Moonraker and You Only Live Twice on the shelf waiting for me.

Pruitt
12-06-2010, 02:06 PM
I've been on a big Cormac McCarthy kick lately. I've read The Road, which blew me away, Child of God, and am almost done reading part 1 of the Border Trilogy, All The Pretty Horses. He does not use punctuation and grammar like most writers, but his prose is so eerie and hypnotizing that I could read pretty much anything of his. I'm excited to get to No Country For Old Men after this trilogy.

I recently bought some old Ian Fleming books from the James Bond series. I read Casino Royale, which was excellent. It's the first book, but the way it jumps directly into the story it's as if you're glimpsing into the life of this international spy who was already been around a long time. There's no introductions, no explanations, just immediate story. Great, short read. I have Moonraker and You Only Live Twice on the shelf waiting for me.


No Country For Old Men is a great book - maybe even better than the movie which was also amazing.

I read all of the Ian Fleming books years ago, and have never been able to find a "spy" novelist whose work I've enjoyed as much. Your point about the novels just jumping right into the story is a great one Too much thriller and mystery writing nowadays is bloated and badly in need of editing. Another reason why Cormac McCarthy is so great. He gets right to the point.

JaneThom
12-06-2010, 03:29 PM
Check out, "The Know it All" by A. J. Jacobs. Nerdy, Sentimental and Hilarious- all in one.

Wordsworth
12-06-2010, 06:55 PM
No Country For Old Men is a great book - maybe even better than the movie which was also amazing.

I read all of the Ian Fleming books years ago, and have never been able to find a "spy" novelist whose work I've enjoyed as much. Your point about the novels just jumping right into the story is a great one Too much thriller and mystery writing nowadays is bloated and badly in need of editing. Another reason why Cormac McCarthy is so great. He gets right to the point.

You should read The Road. It is depressing as hell but has fantastic imagery. I ate it up in two days. One of my favorite books.

brauneyz
12-06-2010, 07:09 PM
You should read The Road. It is depressing as hell but has fantastic imagery. I ate it up in two days. One of my favorite books.

An alternate POV .... I thought The Road was the most putrid read ever! I love traipsing over to the dark side, so I didn't mind that it was depressing, but it was so boring. At the end, I just wanted everyone dead already because I didn't care about any of them. I know, I'm an awful person. :(

I have his The Crossing on my bookshelf and will get to it eventually, but if it's not better in the first 50 pages or so than The Road, I'll donate it quickly.

Love the diversity in this thread though!

BMW
12-06-2010, 07:38 PM
I read 4 to 5 books a year. Enjoy reading when I do it, but it takes a lot for me to sit down. I like biographies a lot. Currently reading a biography on George Muller. Amazing life story about his faith and putting it to use in a life of running an orphanage.

SpartaChris
12-07-2010, 01:20 AM
On a serious note, I was a huge fan of Richard Bachman's (AKA Stephen King) "Rage" and "The Long Walk."

Mostly I read James Patterson, James Rollins, Karin Slaughter and Lincoln Child. Will mix in a little Dan Brown. Loved Digital Fortress and Deception Point.

GoBigOrGoHome
01-13-2011, 09:38 PM
I am seeing ads here on FP for audible.com. I have been an audible.com member for years and highly recommend them if you are into audiobooks. Great selection for all genres plus a ton free content available to members.

Swami
01-13-2011, 09:47 PM
i read a s**tload, but don't come to this site to discuss it. I will say, though, that Adam Carolla's book, In 50 Years We'll All Be Chicks, is quite funny and better than you'd expect.

brauneyz
01-13-2011, 11:12 PM
i read a s**tload, but don't come to this site to discuss it. I will say, though, that Adam Carolla's book, In 50 Years We'll All Be Chicks, is quite funny and better than you'd expect.

So why not? Or don't you think the chicks can compete? :p

GoBigOrGoHome
01-14-2011, 05:21 AM
So why not? Or don't you think the chicks can compete? :p


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ej3zyrqscTA

Pruitt
01-14-2011, 08:30 AM
"The Complete Western Stories of Elmore Leonard" is currently my fall back book.

Many of the stories are similar, but still a lot of fun.

Pruitt
11-02-2012, 03:02 PM
Thought I'd reincarnate this thread.

"The Sisters Brothers" by Patrick DeWitt is a great read. A western, but not a typical one. Well written, funny and violent. Throughly recommended.

And Dave Eggers' "A Hologram For The King" is good... but not great. An interesting premise, but the main character is a bit uninvolving. Eggers' two previous books "Zeitoun" and the absolutely extraordinary "What Is The What" succeeded because the main characters - who were real people - were allowed to tell their own story.

Pruitt
12-03-2012, 05:09 PM
Another great recent read; "The Psychopath Test" by Jon Ronson.

This writer is great - he wrote "the Men Who Stare At Goats" and "Them." A journalist who specializes in reporting on absolute lunatics. Survivalists, Army guys who performed experiments in telekinesis, hard core conspiracy nuts etc.

In this book he focuses on psychopaths and those who tried to cure them. And here's the thing - the book is funny as hell.

wxwax
01-10-2013, 07:52 PM
I stumbled across a site that lists free Kindle books. And that led me to a free Kindle novel that tickles my sci-fi fancy.

On Basilisk Station by David Webber. It's the first novel in a long series featuring heroine extraordinaire Honor Harrington, who starts the books as a Navy spaceship captain. The novel is overtly modeled on the Horatio Hornblower series, which suits me fine. It's in the space opera tradition of Ender's Game and Starship Troopers, which also suits me fine.

wxwax
01-19-2013, 03:20 PM
Just gotta say that this Kindle thing has really amped-up my reading. For some reason, reading books has been physically uncomfortable for some time. But reading the Kindle is a breeze, really enjoyable.

iwatt
01-19-2013, 04:26 PM
I stumbled across a site that lists free Kindle books. And that led me to a free Kindle novel that tickles my sci-fi fancy.

On Basilisk Station by David Webber. It's the first novel in a long series featuring heroine extraordinaire Honor Harrington, who starts the books as a Navy spaceship captain. The novel is overtly modeled on the Horatio Hornblower series, which suits me fine. It's in the space opera tradition of Ender's Game and Starship Troopers, which also suits me fine.

That series is adictive, by the way

xmenehune
01-19-2013, 04:27 PM
wish I had time to read fiction, then maybe a kindle will do, as it is I read more technical manuals and books, I find it easier to find what I need, especially if I need to go back and find an article in a rag, the digital stuff does have search, but for some reason I find things a lot faster with tactile and visual memory, just an ad will sometimes jar my noggin to remember what I thought I had forgotten.

edave
01-19-2013, 05:41 PM
I mostly use my iPad to read books and manuals, etc using a variety of readers depending on content. I also mostly use the iPad in place of my kindle except for two situations. Midday outdoor reading is a non starter without some kind of shade or if I'm moving around a bit. I've dropped my kindle (a 2nd generation I think) a lot. The flimsy plastic is scared and battle weary but continues to work.

I convert everything to epub or pdf and except for the kindle store, I try to buy that way too. It's easier.

wxwax
01-19-2013, 05:50 PM
I haven't tried a backlit display, other than computers and my cellphone. The Kindle's battery life is amazing.

For whatever reason, reading a book seemed to strain my eyes, give me a headache, make me uncomfortable. I assumed it was something to do with my eyesight. All I can say is that in moderate to normal light, the Kindle display is extremely easy on the eyes. It's clear and crisp, the font size is perfect and the background color is off-white enough to not glare. I used to hesitate before picking up a book, now I look forward to it. Took me a while to realize my changed behavior.

I haven't looked for books anywhere but Amazon. Lately I've become a grazer on their daily release of free books. As an aside, I had no idea that self-publishing e-books was such a common practice.

packa7x
01-19-2013, 06:52 PM
I've been reading a book on the physics of the next 100 years by Michio Kaku...love that guy.

vancemeek
01-19-2013, 07:49 PM
Somebody mentioned Terry Pratchett in this thread, and I say Bravo. The Discworld books are just fantastic in every way. I highly recommend them to anybody that likes humor and/or fantasy.

I'm also a huge Stephen King fan. I'm a member of the Stephen King Library, and have hardback copies of all of his books, as well as comic adaptations of The Stand and The Dark Tower.

Other than that, I'm pretty open to anything. I'm reading a lot of fantasy right now, but also enjoy sci-fi (syfy???), horror, and good crime/thriller/adventure books. Ed McBain is one of my favorites, as well as Clive Cussler. Douglas Preston/Lincoln Child collaborations are good. Joe Hill's Horns is good, for one I finished recently. Matthew Reilly has some good adventure novels as well. I'll post others as I think of them.

wxwax
01-19-2013, 09:05 PM
I'm reading a lot of fantasy right now, but also enjoy sci-fi (syfy???), horror, and good crime/thriller/adventure books. Ed McBain is one of my favorites, as well as Clive Cussler. Douglas Preston/Lincoln Child collaborations are good. Joe Hill's Horns is good, for one I finished recently. Matthew Reilly has some good adventure novels as well. I'll post others as I think of them.

I'm not much for fantasy, with one strong exception: Neil Gaiman. The guy's something special. He manages to capture creepy and comfy at the same time. Someone handed me Neverwhere and it blew me away. Since then I've enjoyed his take on mythology, even if I don't always understand it (American Gods.)

edave
01-19-2013, 10:54 PM
I'm also a huge Stephen King fan. I'm a member of the Stephen King Library, and have hardback copies of all of his books, as well as comic adaptations of The Stand and The Dark Tower.

My wife was a huge King fan, still is somewhat but I fell off the bandwagon a long while ago. Cujo or Pet Sematary freaked me out and I dove into civil war history for a while. And yes, graphic descriptions of civil war injuries were preferable to King at some point.


Other than that, I'm pretty open to anything. I'm reading a lot of fantasy right now, but also enjoy sci-fi (syfy???), horror, and good crime/thriller/adventure books. Ed McBain is one of my favorites, as well as Clive Cussler. Douglas Preston/Lincoln Child collaborations are good. Joe Hill's Horns is good, for one I finished recently. Matthew Reilly has some good adventure novels as well. I'll post others as I think of them.

I'm not big on fantasy but 'On a Pale Horse' by Piers Anthony has stuck with me for a long time. I liked several of the books in the series until it seemed to hit a wrong note and I moved on. Jeepers, it's been out for almost 30 years. Do you like soft SciFi or hard? Either way, find a way at some point to read the best work of Niven. Start with Ringworld or The Mote in Gods Eye. Both will give you an indication if you want to continue in that direction.

Which Preston/Child do you like best? I read Relic a while back and enjoyed it.

Cussler's Dirk Pitt novels are great for a cross country plane flight. It's like a BLT with extra mayo. Add a real BLT (bring with you) and a Bloody Mary from the cart and you're set.

I don't know who (if anyone) does serious mystery/spy stuff these days. From the early 70s that title was passed from Alistair MacLean to Robert Ludlum to Tom Clancy who kinda reinvented the genre and killed it all at once. By the end of the Ryan series (late 90's or so?) they were up over 1,000 pages per volume and included maneuvering with and against most of the world. It has been years since I read Force 10 From Navarone but I'd bet it still works. The Bourne series from Ludlum definitely works. I checked that out of the local library when they started showing the new film series.

darvon
01-19-2013, 11:33 PM
The Ryan series didn't end...... it just got postponed for a divorce settlement. Even John Clark is still kicking around.

Try John Scalzi, fave author.

And the Dresden series by Jim Butcher

And I love the Pupeteers and Austfeller in the Known Universe

I have loved Spencer. And Bernie Rhodenbarr. Westlake was great, as was DeAndrea...rest their souls.

Scalzi, Niven, Lerner, Butcher, Clancy. Rinse and Repeat.

Who did I miss???

darvon
01-19-2013, 11:35 PM
Oh and I loved Micheal Crichton.

I was in one of his books and just missed being in an Elmore Leonard book. Darn.

darvon
01-19-2013, 11:36 PM
Carl Hiassen is good.

vancemeek
01-19-2013, 11:39 PM
Which Preston/Child do you like best? I read Relic a while back and enjoyed it.

Pretty much all of them really. The Pendergrast books are really good, IMO. I did also like Relic.

vancemeek
01-19-2013, 11:40 PM
Oh and I loved Micheal Crichton.

I was in one of his books and just missed being in an Elmore Leonard book. Darn.

Michael Crichton is good as well.

tubbs1518
01-20-2013, 12:15 AM
If you like fantasy books check out the Dragonlance series by Tracy Hickman and Margarete Weis and the Drizzt series by R.A. Salvatore. Both are fantastic.

wxwax
01-20-2013, 12:15 AM
I don't know who (if anyone) does serious mystery/spy stuff these days. From the early 70s that title was passed from Alistair MacLean to Robert Ludlum to Tom Clancy who kinda reinvented the genre and killed it all at once. By the end of the Ryan series (late 90's or so?) they were up over 1,000 pages per volume and included maneuvering with and against most of the world. It has been years since I read Force 10 From Navarone but I'd bet it still works. The Bourne series from Ludlum definitely works. I checked that out of the local library when they started showing the new film series.

I grew up devouring Alistair MacLean. His style made me want to write a book like he did, although I've never actually tried to. If you haven't yet read any Len Deighton spy stuff, he's interesting. Lots of English cultural references which will be opaque to you because they're both English and dated. But still, an interesting take. To find titles go here (http://www.deightondossier.net/), cursor on the Books tab at the top, and look at "Unnamed Spy" and "The Samson Series."

I once bought a Ludlum book at the airport and was shocked to discover that it had been written after his death. Apparently there's a cottage industry of taking dead authors and flogging new books under their name. About as unethical as it gets, to my mind.

tubbs1518
01-20-2013, 12:16 AM
Michael Crichton is good as well.

Really enjoyed Prey, State of Fear and Pirate Latitudes.

wxwax
01-20-2013, 12:19 AM
Scalzi, Niven, Lerner, Butcher, Clancy. Rinse and Repeat.


I have some Scalzi and Niven and a couple of other "hard" sci-fi writers. Have to confess I'm more a space opera kind of guy. When a story gets mired in technical details I bog down and lose interest. I found the sequels to Ender's Game unreadable.

darvon
01-20-2013, 12:44 AM
How about Disclosure?

wxwax
01-20-2013, 03:35 AM
How about Disclosure?

I have issues with Mr. Crichton's dabbling in science he knew nothing about. Writing a contrarian book about sexual harassment fits the unflattering image I have of him.

edave
01-20-2013, 12:31 PM
The Ryan series didn't end...... it just got postponed for a divorce settlement. Even John Clark is still kicking around.

Nah, it's dead. The Clancy machine that amazed us with 500 pages a year died in the mid 90's. Someone is making a lot of money off the name and reputation, but I'm not interested.


Try John Scalzi, fave author.

I will. Missed him somehow.


And I love the Pupeteers and Austfeller in the Known Universe

Eh?


Oh and I loved Michael Crichton

I was in one of his books and just missed being in an Elmore Leonard book. Darn.

Some I like, some I don't. He was an odd fellow (and collected even odder art). Which book did you figure in?

wxwax
01-26-2013, 03:03 AM
For the last two or three weeks I've been using my Kindle to wade around in Amazon's daily free books. My tastes are trashy, science fiction and mystery thrillers for the most part.

I have noticed a pattern. This Amazon reviewer sums it up:



I am a male and could not understand what all the references to emotions were all about throughout the book, then I checked and realized the author is a woman. Then I looked at all these great Amazon reviews and see they are mostly women. I warn all males, this is not a book you will enjoy.

http://www.freesmileys.org/smileys/smiley-laughing004.gif (http://www.freesmileys.org/smileys.php)

I'm pretty sure that if you gave me a book but didn't tell me who the author was, I could guess the sex of the author with a fair degree of accuracy. In the shallow end where I splash about, the male authors are more or less interested in plot and action. Whereas the female authors spend a great deal more time on the feelings and thoughts of their characters. It's a pronounced difference. And one that amuses me no end. :)

KabaModernFan
02-03-2013, 03:39 AM
I feel like this is the best place to put this.

So I'm not a huge casual reader. If I happen to find something I like, I'll read it, but I can probably count the number of real books I read per year on both of my hands. And rarely do I ever read fiction. However, one day while browsing the internet I stumbled upon a visual novel by the name of Katawa Shoujo, which translates to English as Disability Girls. I doubt that anybody here is even vaguely familiar with it, and it was released just last year, so I'll elaborate a bit. I'm not good at explaining things, so bear with me here. Also, I should warn that the story skews quite a bit towards a younger audience, as evidenced by the fact that nearly all of the main characters are high school seniors.

Anyway, the main protagonist of the story is teenage boy named Hisao Nakai, who in the beginning of the novel has a sudden heart attack due to a previously undiagnosed case of arrhythmia. After a few months in the hospital, he is transferred to a school for children who are disabled in one way or another. The rest of the novel explores the lives of relationships of Nakai and the people he meets and befriends along the way, eventually turning into a love story between Nakai and one of the five other main characters who also attend the school with disabilities of their own. I say "one of the five" because the novel is also interactive, and features occasional points where the reader makes a choice which causes the story to fork and branch out in different directions.

Now, there is a very good chance that I'm young and stupid. However, I can safely say that between books, movies, television, video games, and all other fictional media of that sort, I cannot recall being more emotionally impacted in such a powerful manner than I was by this novel. The subject matter is handled in an extremely sincere and tasteful way, and it's a story with quite mature eroge elements in it that are also handled very well. The adult content can be removed as well if the reader prefers, without the cost of losing very much character or plot development. Anyway, I just felt like I should give it a mention here, considering how much I enjoyed it. Feel free to carry on with real literature now :p

darvon
02-03-2013, 11:12 AM
\

Some I like, some I don't. He was an odd fellow (and collected even odder art). Which book did you figure in?


Austfeller and pupeteers were in Larry Niven's Known Space series. It was written a while ago, and then added on in the last 5 years with 4 books. I might start with the first of those and then if you like it, jump back as you go forward.

I was in Disclosure. Crichton came and stayed at our company, Silicon Graphics, for about 2-3 months. The plot has nothing to do with what happened, but the skeleton of Disclosure is a high tech company, which we provided the model for. It was interesting to see little details from SGI and the people there reflected in the book. No one person was mapped into 1 character, its more like chunks of multiple people were glued together to make the traits of the characters. I saw pieces of me in 3 characters, but I saw other people, including 'catch phrases", positions, even kitsch in their offices, in those characters and all over the book. Again the main personality of the characters didn't really match anyone, it was the little details that were cloned.

In the movie, the character I saw most of my stuff in was played by Demi Moore. :woot:

Again, it wasn't one of his best books, but it was a kick and a half to play "spot the person" while reading a 700 page book.

darvon
02-03-2013, 11:15 AM
Now, there is a very good chance that I'm young and stupid.

Don't knock Young and Stupid, it beats Old and Stupid every time.

edave
02-03-2013, 12:31 PM
Austfeller and pupeteers were in Larry Niven's Known Space series. It was written a while ago, and then added on in the last 5 years with 4 books. I might start with the first of those and then if you like it, jump back as you go forward.

I know who the Niven Puppeteers were (read two books IIRC), but that other word is not known by Google and nothing like it can be found near Puppeteers or Niven.


I was in Disclosure. Crichton came and stayed at our company, Silicon Graphics, for about 2-3 months. The plot has nothing to do with what happened, but the skeleton of Disclosure is a high tech company, which we provided the model for. It was interesting to see little details from SGI and the people there reflected in the book. No one person was mapped into 1 character, its more like chunks of multiple people were glued together to make the traits of the characters. I saw pieces of me in 3 characters, but I saw other people, including 'catch phrases", positions, even kitsch in their offices, in those characters and all over the book. Again the main personality of the characters didn't really match anyone, it was the little details that were cloned.

Now that is darned fascinating.

Crichton was Peter Norton's neighbor and there was an episode that occurred at PNC and came to a head during the Symantec acquisition. Many people associated with the Peter Norton Group at the time assumed that some part of the story idea came from there.

What did you do at SGI? I had some friends there around the early 90's.

wxwax
02-03-2013, 01:59 PM
In the movie, the character I saw most of my stuff in was played by Demi Moore. :woot:


That's funny, when I read your posts I think of Amanda Seyfried. You sound voluptuous. http://24.media.tumblr.com/tumblr_lyljqlLvzD1r853nfo3_250.jpg

:)

Sequels are dangerous. I rather enjoyed the scifi/fantasy novel In Her Name:Empire by Michael R. Hicks (currently free for Kindle on Amazon (http://www.amazon.com/In-Her-Name-Michael-Hicks/dp/0984673040/ref=ntt_at_ep_dpt_2).) Their free appetizer strategy worked, I bought the two sequels. Rats. Neither had the thoughtfulness or craft of the first novel. It felt like he banged them out in a hurry, and at times the story-telling was downright crude. A real contrast to his first novel.

One of the patterns in the free ebook offerings is series featuring a principal character. They want to hook you on a character so you'll buy multiple books. And silly me swallowed the hook this time.

wxwax
02-03-2013, 02:14 PM
However, one day while browsing the internet I stumbled upon a visual novel by the name of Katawa Shoujo, which translates to English as Disability Girls.


Interesting, an online book that you download (http://www.katawa-shoujo.com/)? Thanks for the tip. (Decades ago I tried to read a paperback novel that was multiple choice and the gimmick overwhelmed the writing. It's hard enough to write one good book, let alone five or six.)

KabaModernFan
02-03-2013, 05:15 PM
Interesting, an online book that you download (http://www.katawa-shoujo.com/)? Thanks for the tip. (Decades ago I tried to read a paperback novel that was multiple choice and the gimmick overwhelmed the writing. It's hard enough to write one good book, let alone five or six.)

I understand your concern over the interactive aspect, it's a fair one. However, in this particular case I don't think that negatively impacts the story in any way. The download is 100% free as well, so I would highly recommend it to anybody who is interested in it further. I get that, considering the subject matter and whatnot, it's not going to be for everyone. At the end of the day it is a story about people, emotions, and relationships though, and that's something that everybody can understand and relate to.

darvon
02-03-2013, 05:31 PM
I know who the Niven Puppeteers were (read two books IIRC), but that other word is not known by Google and nothing like it can be found near Puppeteers or Niven.



Now that is darned fascinating.

Crichton was Peter Norton's neighbor and there was an episode that occurred at PNC and came to a head during the Symantec acquisition. Many people associated with the Peter Norton Group at the time assumed that some part of the story idea came from there.

What did you do at SGI? I had some friends there around the early 90's.

We didn't have any of the high profile harassment cases at SGI. I did the Peripherals. Hard Disks, Memory, Keyboards, Displays. and all the little pieces. The bulk of the revenue was Memory and Disks. Prior to that I did all their software. I relo'd to Detroit for family reasons in late 93 (IIRC) and then retired a couple of years after that.

I was suprised when the book came out and it had sexual harassment as the main theme. Perhaps he grabbed the main theme from Norton

I thought Crighton lived in Boston? Maybe I just assumed he did or maybe he moved.

Patrick Sullivan
10-06-2013, 04:06 PM
Currently I am re-reading 'Skinny Dip' by Carl Hiaasen. Gawd, but this book is funny.

Did any of you ever read Justin Cronin's 'The Passage'? Or the excellent second installment of what is supposed to be a trilogy 'The Twelve'?

brauneyz
10-06-2013, 06:38 PM
Did any of you ever read Justin Cronin's 'The Passage'? Or the excellent second installment of what is supposed to be a trilogy 'The Twelve'?

About a quarter of the way through the first. It's good, but gawd, it's long. Thank goodness I have no fear of commitment.

darvon
10-06-2013, 06:50 PM
Lives of Tao

and

Off the Be the Wizard

Ragar
10-06-2013, 07:06 PM
hitting "The Drunkard's Walk: How Randomness Rules Our Lives" by Leonard Mlodinow.

Interesting read that goes a little history of statistics/random numbers, and ties "current" events as well to the theories ideas, such as the Prosecutor's Fallacy, etc.

Both math intense and "easy" at the same time.

wxwax
10-06-2013, 09:20 PM
I just finished everything by Douglas Adams except Mostly Harmless. I found that the Hitchhiker books, always loose, became progressively more rambling.

I actually started reading Adams because of Dirk Gently. And of the six Adams books that I've read, my favorite is Dirk Gently's Holistic Detective Agency. It's the most tightly plotted and actually seems to be about something. And it feels fresh.

wxwax
10-06-2013, 09:21 PM
Lives of Tao

and

Off the Be the Wizard

On your post, I bought Wizard. I read the Amazon preview snippet of Tao and I think the style isn't for me.

ScottDCP
10-06-2013, 09:32 PM
I just finished everything by Douglas Adams except Mostly Harmless. I found that the Hitchhiker books, always loose, became progressively more rambling.

I actually started reading Adams because of Dirk Gently. And of the six Adams books that I've read, my favorite is Dirk Gently's Holistic Detective Agency. It's the most tightly plotted and actually seems to be about something. And it feels fresh.

Agreed, though they always seem to be about the funny sounding name on top of it all. I suggest trying Terry Pratchett.

vancemeek
10-06-2013, 09:46 PM
Terry Pratchett is a genius. Great stuff.

tubbs1518
10-06-2013, 10:04 PM
Reading 11/22/63. Close to half way through and it has been absolutely fantastic.

wxwax
10-06-2013, 10:32 PM
OK, I bought the first Discworld as well.

ScottDCP
10-06-2013, 10:55 PM
OK, I bought the first Discworld as well.

Excellent. The second is even better, so's you know.

wxwax
10-06-2013, 11:01 PM
Excellent. The second is even better, so's you know.

That's what an Amazon reviewer said, and said the third was even better. But I figure I need to start at the beginning.

Right now I'm reading a weaker version of Conan Doyle's Sherlock Holmes. Written at about the same time, it's about an investigator named Dr. Thorndyke. The author mimics Sherlock's analytical approach, with much more science but much less writing skill. It's a bit of a slog, but it's possible to glean an impression of life in turn-of-the-century London (including the anti-Semitism ), which I enjoy.

vancemeek
10-07-2013, 12:44 AM
Reading 11/22/63. Close to half way through and it has been absolutely fantastic.

As you know, I'm a huge King addict and member of the SK Library book club, and 11/22/63 is one of my all-time favorites. Enjoy.

vancemeek
10-07-2013, 12:46 AM
Excellent. The second is even better, so's you know.

I really enjoyed the first two. The Rincewind books are fantastic, and I really love all the City Watch books. However, I haven't really read any of them that I didn't enjoy. Each is brilliantly written, and full of jabs at real life, both subtle, and not-so-subtle.

vancemeek
10-07-2013, 12:47 AM
That's what an Amazon reviewer said, and said the third was even better. But I figure I need to start at the beginning.

Right now I'm reading a weaker version of Conan Doyle's Sherlock Holmes. Written at about the same time, it's about an investigator named Dr. Thorndyke. The author mimics Sherlock's analytical approach, with much more science but much less writing skill. It's a bit of a slog, but it's possible to glean an impression of life in turn-of-the-century London (including the anti-Semitism ), which I enjoy.

I've read many of them, not all in order, but have started at the beginning recently, reading them chronologically. You don't have to do it that way, but I find I enjoy it, and there are occasional references to other books, so that helps.

ScottDCP
10-07-2013, 10:18 AM
I really enjoyed the first two. The Rincewind books are fantastic, and I really love all the City Watch books. However, I haven't really read any of them that I didn't enjoy. Each is brilliantly written, and full of jabs at real life, both subtle, and not-so-subtle.

I think The Light Fantastic, Guards Guards!, and Witches Abroad are the best, if best there can be, but can only find small criticism for two of the forty or so.

mkocs6
03-28-2014, 01:25 AM
I recently decided that I was spending far too much free time, however much I have--usually that time relaxing before going to bed for the night--streaming crap on Netflix. As a graduate student, I read quite a lot but not much modern fiction. I decided to give it a try, in spite of the weekly quota I have to make it through, because I'm getting the uneasy feeling that too much television--even on the internet and at age 28--is going to rot my brain.

I own a collection of Tobias Wolff's short stories, titled The Night in Question. I started it once upon a time but never finished. It's a winner, I can now report, and in Wolff's style if you've perhaps read his classic This Boy's Life, or one of my personal favorites, Old School. It's punchy and detailed and, occasionally, very funny but more often full of pathos.

I like the short story, because you don't have time every night for Moby Dick, and there's something nice about starting and finishing a good story in one sitting. Anyone have a collection or anthology to recommend?

I know we have a couple of reading threads floating around. I remember another where we talked spy novels, and tonight I checked Graham Greene's classic Our Man in Havana out of the Tulane library. I like the Greene I've read--The End of the Affair and The Power and the Glory--and I've been meaning to read this for some time. I'd be curious to hear what's on everyone else's nightstand, though.

wxwax
03-28-2014, 05:53 PM
I recently discovered Peter Abrahams. He doesn't really have a formula. He's a very strong writer. I loved Oblivion (http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B000OVLK1I/ref=oh_d__o06_details_o06__i00?ie=UTF8&psc=1). It's told entirely from the point of view of a private eye who has a stroke during a case. He suffers from memory loss, delusions and a personality change. It's fascinating.

If you have kids, he also writes as Spencer Quinn. He has a series of crime-solver stories told from the point of view of the detective's sidekick... a dog. As in, the dog's thoughts. It's charming. Here's (http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0078XG22M/ref=oh_d__o04_details_o04__i00?ie=UTF8&psc=1) a 99-cent starter short story, for a taste.

SpartaChris
03-28-2014, 08:56 PM
So I just finished reading "The Passage," by Justin Cronin, as suggested by Biggie. It was, ummm, interesting. Lots of detail you don't really need, akin to Steven King. I mean, why use four words when 20 will do? Anyway, it had a pretty good start, rather boring middle, and VERY strong end. I liked it enough to start on the sequel, called "The Twelve." So far the sequel is kicking it's predecessor's ass.

Patrick Sullivan
03-28-2014, 09:15 PM
So I just finished reading "The Passage," by Justin Cronin, as suggested by Biggie. It was, ummm, interesting. Lots of detail you don't really need, akin to Steven King. I mean, why use four words when 20 will do? Anyway, it had a pretty good start, rather boring middle, and VERY strong end. I liked it enough to start on the sequel, called "The Twelve." So far the sequel is kicking it's predecessor's ass.

"The Passage" has often been compared to Stephen King's "The Stand". I gave up on King a lot of years ago (around the time he got so big-time he was able to demand and receive full editorial control of his work). His books went from long to stupid long. There is a little of that with "The Passage". It finishes strong and sets up the sequel very well.

Cronin really got his footing in "The Twelve". The third installment in the Passage Trilogy - "City of Mirrors" - is due out this fall. I am looking forward to that.

SpartaChris
03-29-2014, 01:26 AM
"The Passage" has often been compared to Stephen King's "The Stand". I gave up on King a lot of years ago (around the time he got so big-time he was able to demand and receive full editorial control of his work). His books went from log to stupid long. There is a little of that with "The Passage". It finishes strong and sets up the sequel very well.

Cronin really got his footing in "The Twelve". The third installment in the Passage Trilogy - "City of Mirrors" - is due out this fall. I am looking forward to that.

"The Stand" is about how I would describe it. It piqued your interest in the beginning, then got pretty dull, but not dull enough to stop reading.

I'm about 1/3 of the way into "The Twelve," and I'm digging it so far. Really hoping it stays strong as well.

edave
03-29-2014, 02:32 AM
I hadn't read a novel in over a year so in the space of 12 days I've read 3. ;)

Two Mickey Haller books I had sitting on my kindle and The Running Man by King (as Richard Bachman) because I'd always wanted to read that one. Very short book and like all King's work it made me uncomfortable at times. I'd given up on King halfway through Pet Sematary which creeped me out so much I had to stop.

Now back to history books again.

SpartaChris
03-29-2014, 03:08 PM
I remember reading several of the "Bachman" books when I was in high school. "The Running Man," "Rage," and "The Long Walk." Loved them.

wxwax
03-29-2014, 05:22 PM
I hadn't read a novel in over a year so in the space of 12 days I've read 3. ;)


I'd stopped reading books until I got a Kindle. I assume that my eyes had in some way become uncomfortable reading a printed book. I certainly wasn't enjoying it and I stopped. The Kindle makes it a lot easier.

mkocs6
03-29-2014, 05:34 PM
I just wanted to get away from screens for a bit. Finished Our Man in Havana. Just started Supreme Courtship by Christopher Buckley.

Thoughts on Greene to come a bit later tonight.

wxwax
03-29-2014, 07:00 PM
I just wanted to get away from screens for a bit. Finished Our Man in Havana.

Great movie. Time to hit the screens again. :D

Ragar
03-30-2014, 02:47 PM
Been stuck reading science fiction, specifically the Warhammer 40k series and 30k Horus Heresy series. Summer time is coming up which means back to reading more serious stuff again. Thinking about re-reading all of Mark Twain's works. and knock out some other classics.

Patrick Sullivan
03-30-2014, 05:43 PM
I hadn't read a novel in over a year so in the space of 12 days I've read 3. ;)

Two Mickey Haller books I had sitting on my kindle and The Running Man by King (as Richard Bachman) because I'd always wanted to read that one. Very short book and like all King's work it made me uncomfortable at times. I'd given up on King halfway through Pet Sematary which creeped me out so much I had to stop.

Now back to history books again.

Love the Mickey Haller books. Harry Bosch as well.

wxwax
03-30-2014, 06:39 PM
Finished my first Dean Koontz stories. The guy has a taste for the very, very unusual. In the short story Wilderness we have a child so hideous to behold that even his own mother can't look at him, and they live in a remote forest.

In Odd Thomas we have a sort-of crime solver, a youngster who sees and communicates with ghosts, and who senses evil. I was both disturbed and intrigued by this one -- it was often unsettling. Not the thing you want to have on your mind as your turn out the lights and go to sleep. My quibble is with a somewhat pat ending. His writing style is a bit self-consciously "authory" for my taste, but otherwise I enjoyed it.

darvon
03-30-2014, 07:06 PM
I just went back through Amazon and found every author who I have purchased and liked (fiction) since the turn of the century. Can someone look at the list and find an author not listed that matches the pattern? I have tried a few web sites to do this with no luck. They tend to just give me all the books of these authors until I mark all as read, which takes hours.

My list

John Scalzi
Jim Butcher
Larry Niven
Edward Lerner
Scott Meyer
Ernest Cline
Tom Clancy
Stephen Campbell
some David Balducci but not all
stephen hunter
Carl Hiassen
Dave Barry
Robert Asparin
David Gerrold
Lawrence Block
Stephen Coonts
George RR Martin [I actually didn't read him, it was a recommendation and I cant remember if I read it at all, or just didn't like it]
Robert Parker
Ron Goulart
Dean Ing
Harry Harrison
Donald Westlake
Keith Laumer
Dan Jenkins
Richard Marcinko
Spider Robinson
Mike Lupica
Roger Zelasny
Lee Childs
L Neil Smith
Richard Hoyt

Patrick Sullivan
03-30-2014, 07:25 PM
Finished my first Dean Koontz stories. The guy has a taste for the very, very unusual. In the short story Wilderness we have a child so hideous to behold that even his own mother can't look at him, and they live in a remote forest.

In Odd Thomas we have a sort-of crime solver, a youngster who sees and communicates with ghosts, and who senses evil. I was both disturbed and intrigued by this one -- it was often unsettling. Not the thing you want to have on your mind as your turn out the lights and go to sleep. My quibble is with a somewhat pat ending. His writing style is a bit self-consciously "authory" for my taste, but otherwise I enjoyed it.

I used to read a lot of Koontz. Books like Cold Fire, Lightning, Intensity. Great reads if you are in the mood for some creepiness. And they read fast. I used to burn a Koontz book in about a day.

darvon
03-30-2014, 07:46 PM
The book genome project looks interesting, but it closed down/stopped and I can't find any news about it.

Anyone know???

darvon
03-30-2014, 08:11 PM
Pandora for Books

This would be sooo easy for Amazon to do.

For Person X, find all of the authors that Person X bought on different dates (i.e. liking the first book and getting another by same author) for fiction. For a typical heavy reader that's probably about 20 authors. Find all people that double bought ALL of those authors and give 1 point per person for each other author double bought. Total the points and give the top 10 authors as suggestions.

Take about 10 minutes to code. It would run awhile, though.

THen you would have a ranked list of recommendations for the purchaser. Nothing for the buyer to do but sit back and cherry pick the list.

Note: this is NOT what goodreads does. Goodreads just isn't that useful.

wxwax
03-30-2014, 08:32 PM
I just went back through Amazon and found every author who I have purchased and liked (fiction) since the turn of the century. Can someone look at the list and find an author not listed that matches the pattern? I have tried a few web sites to do this with no luck. They tend to just give me all the books of these authors until I mark all as read, which takes hours.

My list

For scifi, you might like Vernor Vinge. I read and enjoyed A Deepness in the Sky (http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B002H8ORKM/ref=oh_d__o02_details_o02__i00?ie=UTF8&psc=1). A mix of hard scifi and a little space opera.

For your Lee Childs lone hunter fix, you might try the John Rain series by Barry Eisler (http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_noss_1?url=search-alias%3Ddigital-text&field-keywords=john%20rain&sprefix=john+rai%2Cdigital-text&rh=i%3Adigital-text%2Ck%3Ajohn%20rain). These ought to be read in order.

edave
03-30-2014, 11:07 PM
I just went back through Amazon and found every author who I have purchased and liked (fiction) since the turn of the century. Can someone look at the list and find an author not listed that matches the pattern? I have tried a few web sites to do this with no luck. They tend to just give me all the books of these authors until I mark all as read, which takes hours.

Larry Niven

Have you read any of the books Niven did with Pournell?

I enjoyed Lucifer's Hammer, The Mote in God's Eye, The Gripping Hand and Footfall even though I don't typically like Pournell's stand alone or collaborative work.

Andy Freeland
05-07-2014, 12:00 AM
I don't know if we've ever discussed audio books but if anyone is into them Amazon local has a great deal right now. 3 months of audible.com for $2.
https://local.amazon.com/national/B00JEH9Q3M

You get 1 book a month, so 3 books for $2 is hard to beat. As I understand it you're buying the books so you don't have to listen to all 3 in the next 3 months. Just get the books you want and cancel before the trial ends.

I used to love audio books on long car trips but I haven't made a long car trip in years so I haven't listened to any in a long time. I might get something monstrous like 'rise and fall of the 3rd reich' just to keep on my phone and listen to when I'm stuck somewhere I don't want to be.

Patrick Sullivan
05-07-2014, 03:50 AM
I don't know if we've ever discussed audio books but if anyone is into them Amazon local has a great deal right now. 3 months of audible.com for $2.
https://local.amazon.com/national/B00JEH9Q3M

You get 1 book a month, so 3 books for $2 is hard to beat. As I understand it you're buying the books so you don't have to listen to all 3 in the next 3 months. Just get the books you want and cancel before the trial ends.

I used to love audio books on long car trips but I haven't made a long car trip in years so I haven't listened to any in a long time. I might get something monstrous like 'rise and fall of the 3rd reich' just to keep on my phone and listen to when I'm stuck somewhere I don't want to be.

FWIW, I was an audible.com customer for years. I cancelled my membership a few years ago. I still own every one of the over 300 audiobooks I purchased. I do not have one bad thing to say about Audible. $2 for 3 books? That is a no-brainer.

mkocs6
05-13-2014, 03:34 PM
I follow the Paris Review on twitter (https://twitter.com/parisreview). It's a prominent literary quarterly, and one of its hallmarks is its series, Writers at Work, which is the in-depth interview with an author of some prominence. If you like early and mid twentieth-century literature, you'll enjoy following this account, because they post their older interviews all the time.

I'm a great fan of Evelyn Waugh's work and satire, so I found this interview particularly enjoyable (http://www.theparisreview.org/interviews/4537/the-art-of-fiction-no-30-evelyn-waugh). If you have read him and like his writing style and sense of humor, I don't think you'll be disappointed.

mkocs6
05-14-2014, 11:31 AM
Ernest Hemingway, Col. Buck Lanham, and a soldier--September 1944

http://www.jfklibrary.org/~/media/assets/Audiovisual/Still%20Photographs/Ernest%20Hemingway%20Photograph%20Collection/EH%203749P.jpg

Christ, what badasses.

Bunghole
06-10-2014, 02:25 AM
I am new to the thread...but an old reader. Lately I've been consuming a lot of eclectic selections in books. Many are historical or biographical in nature. Off the top of my head, I'll recommend:

Team of Rivals, by Doris Kearns-Goodwin
Sacre Bleu by Christopher Moore (funny as all get out)
Robert E Lee by Michael Korda
John Barleycorn by Jack London (his best book, IMO)


Eh...can't think of anymore right now. Read Keith Richard's, Vince Neil's, Michael Jordan's, etc books...easy, entertaining reads. Worth mentioning but not stellar in any way...

Andy Freeland
06-10-2014, 03:00 AM
So I just finished reading "The Passage," by Justin Cronin, as suggested by Biggie.


I don't know if we've ever discussed audio books but if anyone is into them Amazon local has a great deal right now. 3 months of audible.com for $2.

To combine these 2 posts, the first book I got on audible was the Passage because you guys talked about it so much. I'm only listening to it when I mow the lawn so it's slow going. Pretty good so far.

I also got all of the game of thrones books for kindle for $20. I like the series, thought I'd try the books even though I know most of the story. The series can be so confusing, reading the books helps. But talk about slow going, I'm going to be working on them for a while. And while the show is good and the stories lines are interesting the writing is .... not great.

Bunghole
06-10-2014, 03:04 AM
I can't decide if Martin's Game Of Throne books are better than the TV series or not. Both are pretty good and also exhaustive on details. And of course, there's also the inability or whatever of Martin to cohesively wrap up the plot within the next say, twelve books or so.

:)

mkocs6
06-10-2014, 04:18 AM
Doris Kearns-Goodwin sucks.

mkocs6
06-10-2014, 04:22 AM
Sorry, that was a bit abrupt. She's not really an historian and she's a 'serial plagiarizer,' (as the authors of this piece ably demonstrate (http://www.salon.com/2012/08/19/americas_worst_historians/)) which is the blasphemy against the Holy Ghost of the academy.

Patrick Sullivan
06-10-2014, 07:58 AM
To combine these 2 posts, the first book I got on audible was the Passage because you guys talked about it so much. I'm only listening to it when I mow the lawn so it's slow going. Pretty good so far.

The narrator (Scott Brick) is one of the better ones out there. Stick with it, Andy. Once the story gets moving, it gets really good. The Twelve is the second in what is supposed to be a trilogy. Brick does a nice job with that book as well.

Andy Freeland
06-10-2014, 11:49 AM
Doris Kearns-Goodwin sucks.

As anyone who has seen Ken Burns' Baseball (which should be everyone) knows, she is a Red Sox fan and therefore gets a pass.

wxwax
06-10-2014, 07:45 PM
Sorry, that was a bit abrupt. She's not really an historian and she's a 'serial plagiarizer,' (as the authors of this piece ably demonstrate (http://www.salon.com/2012/08/19/americas_worst_historians/)) which is the blasphemy against the Holy Ghost of the academy.

I read some of Robert Caro's volumes on Lyndon Johnson. Fantastic and exhaustive, with the emphasis on exhausting.

wxwax
06-10-2014, 07:58 PM
I read junk, for the most part. I cannot stop buying Terry Pratchett.

I stumbled across a couple of really, really good short stories by a man named David Marusek. For a buck you can read She Was Good, She Was Funny (http://www.amazon.com/She-Was-Good-Funny-ebook/dp/B004XTKGCQ/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&m=AG56TWVU5XWC2&s=digital-text&qid=1303686006&sr=1-2). I think it's more than worth it.

Old Mr. Flood (http://www.amazon.com/Old-Mr-Flood-Joseph-Mitchell-ebook/dp/B001PTHY5O/ref=la_B000APJ5KG_1_6?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1402440602&sr=1-6) by John Mitchell is intensely readable. People portraits from a less privileged part of New York City in the 1940s. Mitchell was a revered writer for the New Yorker.

I've dipped into old detective fiction with Dorothy Sayers (Lord Peter Whimsey) and Ellery Queen. Merely OK. I've read one of Tony Dunbar's mysteries, (http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0081HNT7U/ref=oh_d__o08_details_o08__i00?ie=UTF8&psc=1) set in New Orleans and featuring a semi-crooked lawyer. I'll try another. I have a three-book compendium of Inspector Morse novels by Colin Dexter. The character's interesting, the story-telling less so.

I read two Vernor Vinge sci-fi stories and while they're interesting, I think I'm about done with him. Highly imaginative and he can create real tension. He also knows how to stretch a story out, which annoys me.

Bunghole
06-11-2014, 12:14 AM
Sorry, that was a bit abrupt. She's not really an historian and she's a 'serial plagiarizer,' (as the authors of this piece ably demonstrate (http://www.salon.com/2012/08/19/americas_worst_historians/)) which is the blasphemy against the Holy Ghost of the academy.

I didn't know any of that about her, and whether or not she paid people to do research, the end result is that "Team Of Rivals" is STILL a great book.

mongo
06-11-2014, 08:17 AM
Lately, I've been burning through Craig Johnson's Longmire books. Other recent stuff has been Neil Gaiman, Neal Stephenson, William Gibson, John LeCarre, Clive Cussler... Sort of all over.

Andy Freeland
06-11-2014, 10:42 AM
Lately, I've been burning through Craig Johnson's Longmire books. Other recent stuff has been Neil Gaiman, Neal Stephenson, William Gibson, John LeCarre, Clive Cussler... Sort of all over.

The Longmire TV series on Netflix is my latest 'watch while on the treadmill' series. Very good so far. It replaced Justified, which was great the first couple of years then got tedious.

Bengals1181
06-11-2014, 10:59 AM
was happy to see Longmire on Netflix. Didn't get around to it on tv.

My netflix account has been criminally underused lately. I was watching so many shows on the TWC app that they filled up most of my viewing time.

Bengals1181
06-11-2014, 11:01 AM
I've also been watching Dom's Wild Things (http://www.bbcamerica.com/wild-things/) on the TWC app.

mongo
06-11-2014, 11:29 PM
The Longmire TV series on Netflix is my latest 'watch while on the treadmill' series. Very good so far. It replaced Justified, which was great the first couple of years then got tedious.

Yeah. Eventually, you run out of ways for the Marshal to kick the crap out of Kentucky trash, break major rules, and still have a job.

TV Longmire is definitely good, but I wish they'd casted Henry better. He's supposed to be 6'2", built like a brick ****house, and be a terror with a tactical tomahawk.... In the books, Walt and Henry are Vietnam Vets, and Henry was one of those scary dudes who just went into the jungle to terrorize the enemy.

I like Lou Diamond Philips, but he's pretty small and non-imposing in the show.

Matt Kocsan
06-12-2014, 01:05 AM
The Longmire TV series on Netflix is my latest 'watch while on the treadmill' series. Very good so far. It replaced Justified, which was great the first couple of years then got tedious.

Build an episode of 'Longmire' on A&E. Choose one or more of each of the following.

Someone is murdered in Wyoming. The murder involves (a) regional fauna; (b) Indians; (c) some other ethnic or religious group you did not realize had a major presence in Wyoming; or (d) hookers. The sheriff with a dark secret will solve the crime (e) by basically torturing someone using a very Wyoming thing (e.g., a grizzly bear) to extract a confession; or (f) because a suspect will emerge in the last five minutes of the episode from a large pool of nameless candidates. Finally, choose a foil(s) for the sheriff to have a conflict with to keep things moving while exploring the case and high-concept storyline issues: (g) the pretty deputy, whom the show's writers believe is a source of sexual tension even though she isn't; (h) the young deputy from a connected political family who wants to modernize the department and to take his job; (i) his daughter, a lawyer; (j) Lou Diamond Phillips; (k) some random townie.

I also should admit, I watch this show. And kind of like it.

ScottDCP
06-12-2014, 02:26 AM
I read junk, for the most part. I cannot stop buying Terry Pratchett.


That period should be the word "but."

ScottDCP
06-12-2014, 02:29 AM
Build an episode of 'Longmire' on A&E. Choose one or more of each of the following.

Someone is murdered in Wyoming. The murder involves (a) regional fauna; (b) Indians; (c) some other ethnic or religious group you did not realize had a major presence in Wyoming; or (d) hookers. The sheriff with a dark secret will solve the crime (e) by basically torturing someone using a very Wyoming thing (e.g., a grizzly bear) to extract a confession; or (f) because a suspect will emerge in the last five minutes of the episode from a large pool of nameless candidates. Finally, choose a foil(s) for the sheriff to have a conflict with to keep things moving while exploring the case and high-concept storyline issues: (g) the pretty deputy, whom the show's writers believe is a source of sexual tension even though she isn't; (h) the young deputy from a connected political family who wants to modernize the department and to take his job; (i) his daughter, a lawyer; (j) Lou Diamond Phillips; (k) some random townie.

I also should admit, I watch this show. And kind of like it.

Just finished S2E8. I, too, like the show. I have one friend who works on it (prop master,) and he ignores me when I tell him they mispronounce Longmire's favorite beer.

wxwax
06-12-2014, 06:43 PM
That period should be the word "but."

Unbelievably imaginative, entertaining light satire. But the worst one I've read so far is the one where he tried to get more serious with his commentary. Jingo is about the war in Iraq. It's ham-fisted and bad. So I think Pratchett, while very entertaining, is superficial, not serious literature.

ScottDCP
06-12-2014, 07:19 PM
Unbelievably imaginative, entertaining light satire. But the worst one I've read so far is the one where he tried to get more serious with his commentary. Jingo is about the war in Iraq. It's ham-fisted and bad. So I think Pratchett, while very entertaining, is superficial, not serious literature.

While I agree that Jingo wasn't the best thing he ever did I will argue that while it was inspired by the Iraq war, its target was broader, doing more with colonialism and arms escalation in general.

And I will argue forever that light satire cannot be significant literature. Dark stories can be great, but not everything significant or great has to be dark.

Kurt Vonnegut, for example, did not exclusively write dark but he often wrote funny and generally well. He gets mucho praise for being a serious writer. I don't see a lot of difference beyond Patchett's tendency to revisit one place and time.

This is of course based on my inferring that your definition of serious literature is the same as my definition of significant literature. I split hairs all day long, I am told, so it is a natural thing for me to argue.





***Lavyrie Spencer, Danielle Steel, and Douglas Adams? Junk.

ScottDCP
02-27-2015, 01:21 AM
I don't get to read much anymore, but someone who lives nearby is in a book club, giving me late night access every couple months. I recommend Graeme Simsion's The Rosie Project (http://www.amazon.com/Rosie-Project-Novel-Graeme-Simsion/dp/1476729093/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1425014489&sr=8-1&keywords=the+rosie+project).

For a qualifier, I find Serious Literature (more accurately Heavy Handed Explorations of Misery And/Or The Human Condition As Seen By Oberlin Grads) tedious. If the author is trying to tell me something other than a story by telling a story, I check out quicklike. Check it out on Amazon (http://www.amazon.com/Rosie-Project-Novel-Graeme-Simsion/dp/1476729093/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1425014489&sr=8-1&keywords=the+rosie+project) and then buy it at a local purveyor of fiction.

ScottDCP
02-27-2015, 01:23 AM
Oh, and a weird thing with Pratchett. He was diagnosed with Alzheimer's four or five years ago. His writing style has changed. Still good, but different. Impatient, with occasions of character chattiness that don't always fit the historical development of said characters.

Andy Freeland
02-27-2015, 10:19 PM
I just finished "I'm off to be the Wizard" by Scott Meyer. It started off really strong. Great concept, well thought out. It's a 3 book series (so far) and the first 1/2 to 3/4 of the first book was spent setting up the 'rules of the game', what is and isn't allowed in the universe that the book creates, along with why and how. That sounds really boring but it was the best part of the book. It's all done in story mode, not like it's a list of rules and regulations. Towards the end he creates more of a storyline/sets up the bad guy. That was a little weak to be honest but still worth reading.

I don't want to give away too much but it's sort of a modern fantasy book. It is based around a form of "magic", but it's technology based not Harry Potter, 'let's whip up a potion of newt eyes to hex the teacher' type stuff. More than anything else, it's very funny and very well written. Good characters, good dialog. Highly recommended, especially for techy geek types.

Rich Gapinski
03-01-2015, 11:37 AM
I got my vacation reading today .

Collision Low Crossers- Nicholas Dawidoff

A year inside pro football with the Jets. This has to be good.

Andy Freeland
03-02-2015, 12:25 AM
Pro football and the Jets. Are those 2 separate books?

Rich Gapinski
03-02-2015, 08:26 AM
Pro football and the Jets. Are those 2 separate books?

It might be. It is pretty thick for a football book. I'm used to 200+/- pages and I'm done. Not this one. The reviews do say that he goes into a detailed profile of Rex Ryan, which may explain the heft.

(Oh, come on, just because he got surgery, I can't do Rex Ryan fat jokes?!? This is not cool. Not cool.)

Matt Kocsan
03-03-2015, 01:38 AM
Rich may be the only one who understands this, Terry Pluto talked a bunch about it before this season, because it featured Mike Pettine. He had good things to say.

Patrick Sullivan
03-03-2015, 03:40 PM
Pro football and the Jets. Are those 2 separate books?

I was thinking the same thing. Like a song set to the music of Bennie & the Jets. "Profootball and the Jets, duh, duh, duhduhduhduh duh..."