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View Full Version : How huge is too huge in the NFL?



Colts01
07-12-2010, 10:23 PM
looking at players like Ted Washington,Mike Williams ,Herman Johnson,Paul Soliai,Aaron Gibson and others weighing over 350 got me thinking how huge is too huge? will we see a time when the O-line will have alot guys over 400 pounds? How much further on the "scale" can we get without guys putting serious risks to their health as young men ,even now in high school most teams have o-linemen tipping 300.Your thoughts?
http://i51.photobucket.com/albums/f369/djerc7/fat_fb_player.jpg

Pattrick
07-13-2010, 05:06 AM
I came to the thread to check it out and saw that picture and now I have so many questions. Who is that kid? Is that a high school player?

Docta
07-13-2010, 05:15 AM
As long as you're good at blocking, pounds don't matter. And I doubt if it's a health risk for them, since they get enough exercise in games and practice. Maybe it's just hard for them to lose weight.

Wordsworth
07-13-2010, 05:28 AM
They do tend to get a good amount of exercise, but the food they eat on a daily basis to stay big probably isn't great for their cholesterol. I think a lot of guys could benefit from losing some weight and being more agile on their feet. Simply being big isn't all that it takes to be a good lineman.

Tinindian
07-13-2010, 06:32 AM
Look at Jake Long with the Dolphins, the guy is 315 and he is ripped. If he wanted he could easily put weight on his frame, so it wouldn't surprise me too much to see guys over 350 and moving around well. You've got to think like Wordsworth said their cholesterol can't be too good to maintain that weight after all the exercise they get. Then again, weight doesn't have a direct correlation to cholesterol levels. I could stand to take off some weight and mine was just checked at 188.

Polishguy00
07-13-2010, 07:12 AM
If you can't fit into a mold of Terrance Cody, you are too big. If your easy chair is actually Gilbert Brown and you break him, you are too big.

Andy Freeland
07-13-2010, 08:17 AM
An ESPN article from 2006 stating that the heaviest former NFL players are twice as likely as smaller former players to die before the age of 50.
http://sports.espn.go.com/nfl/news/story?id=2313476

But is that really pertinent? Can't you say that about any profession? I would be much more interested in the body fat percentage than in the weight. At 6-3, 264 lbs, Vernon Gholston has a BMI (body mass index) of 33, which is considered obese, but his body fat percentage reportedly is 6%. I read somewhere that few if any NFL linemen have body fat greater than 30%, which is not terrible (that source is not necessarily reliable, I would be very interested if anyone has better info). There are health risks to having a high BMI even when your body fat is 10%, but the main risks of obesity revolve around the heart, which I don't think is an issue for those in good shape.

The real issue isn't for current players, it's for former players. Guys who are used to working out 5 hours a day and eating anywhere from 4500 to 10,000 (vs 2000 for the average adult male) calories a day. Even those that continue to workout an hour a day as they hit 30, 40, 50 years old, have to drastically change their eating habits.

Kosar19
07-13-2010, 08:17 AM
I don't know if there's a right answer to this question, it probably all depends on the guy. I saw Joe Thomas (LT for Cleveland) soon after he was drafted at the airport. That dude is HUGE, but nowhere near fat. He's Tall and his shoulders are a city block wide, but he's not fat. I think that's the way things are going these days, not like the mid-90's

TheLinc
07-13-2010, 08:53 AM
I would think it's just a matter of being too big for your frame to properly support it. I'm certainly not going to call a 275lb DE who can run a 4.5 fat, out of shape, or anything but Sir, but I find it hard to believe the human body can properly support the amount of mass these guys are required by profession to pack on, and I think it shows.

Much of lineman decreased life expectancy is likely due to the blows to the head http://www.newyorker.com/reporting/2009/10/19/091019fa_fact_gladwell?currentPage=1 (long but great read) but also because their joints simply can't hold up with their body weight along with the wear and tear. Like Andy also pointed out, it's one thing to have that body when you are on an NFL regiment, it's another thing to have it 15 years after your career ended.

GoBigOrGoHome
07-13-2010, 05:34 PM
Look at Jake Long with the Dolphins, the guy is 315 and he is ripped. If he wanted he could easily put weight on his frame, so it wouldn't surprise me too much to see guys over 350 and moving around well.

You see guys at 350+ lbs. moving around well in every NFL game that you watch. Albert Haynesworth goes 375# easy. You need to be physically in the same space with some of these dudes to appreciate just how truly large they are.

My company has done work at the Lions' practice facility. I was in there checking on my crew one day and the entire defensive line walked right past us (no pads/helmets -- gym shorts & t-shirts). I go 6'3" & 330#. Not in the best of shape, not in the worst, either. I am a big man. After that group passed us, all 6 of my guys looked at me and said essentially the same thing. "I thought you were a big dude. THOSE dudes are freaking HUGE!"

GoBigOrGoHome
07-13-2010, 05:45 PM
There are health risks to having a high BMI even when your body fat is 10%, but the main risks of obesity revolve around the heart, which I don't think is an issue for those in good shape.

The real issue isn't for current players, it's for former players. Guys who are used to working out 5 hours a day and eating anywhere from 4500 to 10,000 (vs 2000 for the average adult male) calories a day. Even those that continue to workout an hour a day as they hit 30, 40, 50 years old, have to drastically change their eating habits.

The smart ones trade down to a 2000 calorie a day diet regimen and take the bulk off once they are done playing. More cardio, all that. Look at Chris Spielman. He looks like he is a good 35-40# lighter than his playing days.

DannyMilk
07-14-2010, 03:44 AM
If anyone watched 'Rescue Me' tonight, they'd know that picture refers to a gock.

Now that I got that out of the way.......I'm only 26 years old. I'm 5'7 310 lbs. I've been out of the gym for 2 months (not my choice), but when I get back in I'll be back around 290 in 2 or 3 weeks. I can't get health insurance because of my "size"...I've been in the hospital 2 times in the past 20 years, once for a sprained ankle, and this past month for MRSA/surgery...every time I go to the doctor, he says I'm fine, just to lower my weight and lower my cholesterol, which I do.

I've always been "fat"...I've been 5'7" since I was 14, when I weighed 205. I wrestled, bowled, and played baseball my first 2 years of high school, as well as lifting weights. I had to quit because I live in Chicago, things cost money, and I had to get a job because, well, that's what you do in Chicago when you're 16.

Still, to this day, I burn 60% of my cal intake a day. I've increased my cardio greatly since I started hardcore dieting again in Feb. (dropped 50 lbs, which I've gained back about 20 or so due to doctors orders of just sitting around haha).

I say all this not as a personal thing, but as a reference. I feel fine. I know I don't "look" healthy, but I'm probably in better shape than a lot of thinner people out there. As time goes on, the average man is bigger, stronger, and faster. I think one of my main concerns about football players, and what I've experienced over the last 5 weeks and will continue to for the next 3, is what happens when you AREN'T active and you start to slow down. I think that's where the Ted Washingtons and Keith Traylors need to be careful. If the physical part doesn't get harder, the health part will...just my thoughts.

InNOutBurgler
07-14-2010, 04:54 AM
I'm torn...clearly obesity is a huge health risk. I work with paralyzed veterans and I can more readily see the impact obesity has on the human body because these guys just have their arms for the most part so 20 extra lbs can make or break their productivity.

But obesity and body weight don't necessarily go hand in hand. For my height, the Army always said I should be at 180lbs. I NEVER weighed that since 10th grade, but I always passed my PT tests and looked OK in my uniform...I was able to do the things I needed to do and do some of them very well. If you exceed your 'weight' in the military they test your body fat %, which is a much more accurate reflection of your overall fitness/health.

So are big players more likely to die? Yes...very likely, but size alone doesn't give people a death sentence like morbid obesity does. The fact is that we all have 1 heart, two lungs, etc...they have so much life in them and the harder they have to work the shorter amount of time they will work. Just like a car. If i never take my Scion out of third gear on the freeeway, sure I'll be okay but the engine is going to blow up after 10,000 miles of that abuse.

The more weight you carry, the bigger burden put on your skeletal structure, your muscles, tendons and your organs.

Pattrick
07-14-2010, 05:12 AM
I'm torn...clearly obesity is a huge health risk. I work with paralyzed veterans and I can more readily see the impact obesity has on the human body because these guys just have their arms for the most part so 20 extra lbs can make or break their productivity.

But obesity and body weight don't necessarily go hand in hand. For my height, the Army always said I should be at 180lbs. I NEVER weighed that since 10th grade, but I always passed my PT tests and looked OK in my uniform...I was able to do the things I needed to do and do some of them very well.

Thank you for your service, InNoutBurgler. and thank you for your continued service in caring for our disabled veterans. Not an easy job.

TheLinc
07-14-2010, 06:26 AM
But obesity and body weight don't necessarily go hand in hand. For my height, the Army always said I should be at 180lbs. I NEVER weighed that since 10th grade, but I always passed my PT tests and looked OK in my uniform...I was able to do the things I needed to do and do some of them very well. If you exceed your 'weight' in the military they test your body fat %, which is a much more accurate reflection of your overall fitness/health.

The more weight you carry, the bigger burden put on your skeletal structure, your muscles, tendons and your organs.

To think we've already mastered human health, which has taken million of years to develop, in the very short time we've had modern medicine, is asinine. Body types vary, and there is no set mold for what constitutes being in-shape.

But yes, it would seem that there is logically a tipping point that the body, as designed, can no longer support. As you say, and I agree, it's all about the burden you put on your body. Obese people put the burden on, but the shock of multiple marathons also has been shown to carry long term ligament damage.