Results 1 to 10 of 10

Thread: WSJ and College Football

  1. #1
       
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Detroit
    Posts
    5,770
    Blog Entries
    11

    WSJ and College Football

    The Wall Street Journal has 2 backpage main articles on College Football. One is a weakly written piece on Colleges wanting the NFL to draft kids out of high school.

    The other is one of the worst articles I have seen in a long time.


    #1 "College Sports Goes on the Offensive" - Ben Cohen & Rachel Rachman

    In it the authors take the first 6 paragraphs giving quotes on how the colleges want the NFL to draft straight out of HS, because they believe that would alleviate their "the players don't want to be here" problem, as well as the anti-trust problems, as well as their male pattern baldness problems.

    The authors then waste the next 7 paragraphs ignoring the issues of WOULD a change alleviate the problems on colleges or of WHY should the NFL do this. Except one paragraph that alludes that changing the NFL eligibility rules might alleviate anti-trust issues, citing Clarett, and stating that even though Clarett's initial ruling was overturned, the plaintiffs may have a better chance in a different Circuit, like the 8th.

    Can all you FPers tell the poor authors WHY it is less probable that the NFL lose a case in the 8th, rather than more likely?


    #2 "How the NFL Can Save College Football - And Make a Profit" Matthew Futterman

    The article states how colleges believe that the NFL should draft HS players in order to fix College Football. It also states the NFL is the biggest sports league without a minor league. It then sets out to show how the NFL could have a minor league an make money. It uses the remaining article to raise 6 points. Now I am not a journalist, but I would have thought those 6 points would support the thesis. But I would be wrong. The 6 points are:

    1. Drop the draft age to 18.

    Remember we were talking about a NFL minor league. The only link I can find to the thesis is that the NFL has done economic studies showing that a minor league isn't good business, but the NFL conceded that all those studies were with HS+ 3 years eligibility. Thus this point would actually make those negative studies moot. But that isn't the same as making a positive study. We all know that showing a negative is not germaine is not the same as proving a positive, right? Lame at best. And don't they teach in Journalism 101 when you are making a Expository Essay, you put your strongest (or second strongest) point 1st?

    2. Add five more rounds.

    The paragraph actually talks about 5 more roster slots (if you are scoring at home that is E for headline writer). The paragraph talks about how cheap it would be. Wasn't the thesis about MAKING money, not raising costs only a little bit?

    3. Don't try to start a traditional minor league.

    These paragraphs talk about all the failures of other football leagues and the high expenses they run. Amazingly enough, that is all they talk about. Not one word about the form of a "non-traditional" minor league, or why such a minor league would be good business. Strange point. Really strange.

    4. Hold exhibition games.

    Going from the obtuse to the confused, these paragraphs talk about holding a game with the minor leagues in an all-star mode, shown on Wednesdays in the fall. They cite the tv success of US ARMY ALL-American Bowl and Under Armor Bowl. I think this is some very confused prose on how the minor league would be marketable on tv. I can't even start to list the ways this argument is wrong. Where the other points were just off-point, this one is anti-point.

    5. Make it a Reality Show.

    Actually this one comes closest to actually making a positive argument. But the reality show issue is simply addressing and ameliorating what is lost ($2B in College PR) when sending a star from HS to a dev league, not showing that anything is gained.

    6. Leave College be.

    This point argues that even with a HS dev league, many stars would be late bloomers and come from college anyway. And this is the STRONGEST argument for a dev league? That is really doesn't provide many stars?



    This is worthy of Back Page placement in the Journal??? I think if my son turned this in for 8th grade English class, I would be getting a call from the teacher.

    Shame WSJ. Shame.

  2. #2
       
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Atlanta, GA
    Posts
    11,544
    Quick, name the biggest star in HS football. Don't look it up. Off the top of your head.

    Anyone?

    There's your marketability, right there. There isn't any. And they seriously posit a reality show using 18 year old boys? Can we count the ways that sounds like irresponsible exploitation?

    One thing you omit, darvon, is that very few 18 year old kids are ready to smash bodies with men 4 years or more older than them. It's unsafe.

    Finally, there's the issue of competition. Players need to play against good competition in order to improve. For better or for worse, that's what college provides. A NFL minor league would struggle to give the players the amount and the quality of playing time they'd need to really develop. For an example, we look to reserve teams in England's Premier League. When they can, clubs like to loan out their junior players to lower division or foreign clubs, rather than have them play against other juniors.
    Non-performing performance artist

  3. #3
       
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Detroit
    Posts
    5,770
    Blog Entries
    11
    I think lots of 18 year old boys are able to smash bodies with 21 year olds.

    Plus, who said the average freshman football stud is 18 years old. Take a look at the age of the juniors in the NFL draft. Mostly 22ish not 20.

  4. #4
       
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Detroit
    Posts
    5,770
    Blog Entries
    11
    Eric Fisher was 21 in his Junior year.
    Luke Joeckel was 22 in his Junior year.
    Dion Jordan was 22 in his Junior year.

    So football guys are probably 19 after HS.

    And I don't think the age disparity is all that great a safety issue. I think that is wildly overblown. I think there is more physical difference in size, weight and strength between Alabama and some DIII team than HS 5 stars and NFL.

    But it is moot. The only ones who wants the NFL to draft 18 year olds are the WSJ and Rivals.com.

    Delaney is smart enough by far to know that an 18year old draft does nothing for him, other than provide some competition for 5 stars.

  5. #5
       
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Atlanta, GA
    Posts
    11,544
    Quote Originally Posted by darvon View Post
    I think lots of 18 year old boys are able to smash bodies with 21 year olds.

    Plus, who said the average freshman football stud is 18 years old. Take a look at the age of the juniors in the NFL draft. Mostly 22ish not 20.
    That's because they red shirt in college, not because they leave high school late, isn't it? And the WSJ proposal puts some of these kids are on the NFL teams, if I understood your notes correctly.
    Non-performing performance artist

  6. #6
       
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Detroit
    Posts
    5,770
    Blog Entries
    11
    Quote Originally Posted by wxwax View Post
    That's because they red shirt in college, not because they leave high school late, isn't it? And the WSJ proposal puts some of these kids are on the NFL teams, if I understood your notes correctly.
    Both actually. But I think moreso a late HS grad. Many parent put boys into K at 6 if they are sports wise.

  7. #7
       
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Kentucky
    Posts
    2,868
    Blog Entries
    32
    The NFL doesn't want high school kids going pro, so I don't think this is going to be an issue.
    Twitter @vancemeek "I wish I could say something classy and inspirational, but that just wouldn't be our style. Pain heals. Chicks dig scars. Glory...lasts forever."-Shane Falco

  8. #8
       
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Houston, TX
    Posts
    4,139
    Quote Originally Posted by vancemeek View Post
    The NFL doesn't want high school kids going pro, so I don't think this is going to be an issue.
    Nobody who knows anything about the inner workings of football wants 18 and 19 year olds playing NFL football. I know I have a unique view because I was a college athlete, and what I'm about to post (and have said already) is based on my own opinion, and how closely that opinion follows what the NFL wants.

    I'll start with this.. many keep talking of athletic ability at that age, yet NONE have spoke to mental acumen and the understanding of the game. The ability to process what you see and how you react to it, is as important as the physical aspect of it. Why I find that funny is all of us here are equating a hs football player capable of playing in the NFL on ability alone, and ignoring they may not have the mental make up to do so.

    I'll give a real world analogy.. how many engineers get hired out of high school? How many lawyers? Or doctors? NONE right? They don't know enough to do the job yet. All the promise in the world, but no firm or hospital is hiring them before they KNOW enough to do the job. Football is NO different. It may not involve the same "course work", but the extra 3 years required before admittance into the draft post high school serves the same purpose as requiring a lawyer to attend law school, or a doctor medical school. Their job is too complicated to perform adequately until they have this necessary "education", even with their innate abilities.

    I'll use the perfect example to illustrate my point. Anyone remember amobi okoye? 19 when he was drafted. 6'2 and over 300 lbs. Ran a sub 5 sec 40 at the combine. SUPER intelligent guy. Didn't have the football smarts down. He won on athletic ability. His technique was terrible. Technique that was exposed when he got to the NFL. Had he played more when he was a kid, he would have learned to rely more on his technique, and not his ability to over power and out run everyone.

    So many athletic freaks burn out once they hit the NFL level. Many of them started playing late in highschool and the athleticism carried their lack of knowledge of the schemes/game. Average skill guys stone most of the freaks with limited exposure, because they rely on using their well refined technique, and what the game has taught them. Think about a guy like Zach Thomas here.

    Never should have made it pro. Too small, too slow. Great technique, and a world beater at knowledge of the game. Knowledge and technique he learned over many years besides just a couple in HS and 3 in college. Now he's a legit name for the hof.

    I can even use 2 of my favorite players to bolster my argument here.

    1st is James Harrison. Thank god he's the silverback!! Had he not been so physically developed, he'd have never even gotten a sniff at our team that we cut him from multiple times. A level of physical ability he didn't have at 18. It took years for his mind to catch up to his body. Many, many years in James' case.

    Same with Timmons. Physical specimen, mental specimen? Not so much. We don't even allow him to call the plays 5 years in. We gave that responsibility to a rookie. Had he not had that 3 years as a college player to learn what he did, and the nearly 2 years we parked him on the bench to learn what he needed, he wouldn't be a pro. He was a 20yr old rook.. No team but mine parks 1st rounders for that long.

    Football is equal parts braun to brains. One doesnt work well without the other, in most cases. No 18 yr old has the football brains to play in the NFL. Very, very few have the braun. I'd venture NONE intersect the 2. A player is only great when the two intersect.

    College, or a minor league team are necessary IMHO. As a successful jock in the sport that is my hobby and consumes my free time, football, and a scholarship athlete in another sport that required time in the training room, I can tell you 2 things quite EMPHATICALLY. My body changed quite a bit in my time at college. I added 15% of my body weight in lean muscle, and I wasnt training for bulk. I understand the sport I was playing at 500% the level I did prior to college than when I began it, and I started playing when I was 5. I only wish I understood then what I know now about football..

    17-22 are the prime years to build your body. That's fact, I'm sure our resident expert Curtis would agree. It can be done after, but its easiest during that time frame. Also fact is you can't cover for lack of knowledge with pure athletic ability in most cases.

    Draft busts after college are a great proportion of the early rounds. Making high school kids eligible?? That's such an effin joke... The NFL sucks at recognizing and drafting guys 3 years out of HS now... Good lord the disaster of making hs kids eligible... Sorry darvon, but an 18yr old athlete isn't suited to play physically or mentally vs a 22 yr old athlete of similar pedigree. College PROVES this... So few freshman start. Same with sophmores.. The physical outliers have been proven to be what they are under the current program.

    Most of the drafted players aren't good enough to start among the 10k+ plus division 1 players as freshman, or even sophomores.this is versus the 10k plus d1 guys. There are only 1900 NFL slots for guys to fill. Only about 250 get drafted out of 10k. Most of those drafted never play a regular seAson down. Division 1 scholarship guys have a 2% chance of being drafted. They have a less than 1% chance at getting a second contract. The current system says 98% of the guys good enough to play at the collegiate level won't ever even have a chance at being a pro.

    Why would anyone even THINK skipping college or a developmental league would be a good idea??? Certainly not NFL GM's, and Mr Millen and al Davis aren't calling the shots for any NFL team at this point.

    Sorry to say, but the 3yr rule is beneficial for everyone in this instance. Highschool kids aren't mature enough physically or mentally to play in the NFL. You'd be sending a sheep into a lions den.

    Add to that the CBA and roster rules don't afford the time ANY of the hs guys would need to develop prior to seeing the field.
    Last edited by mikesteelnation1; 10-03-2013 at 06:00 AM.
    "If I could start my life all over again, I would be a professional football player, and you damn well better believe I would be a Pittsburgh Steeler." Jack Lambert, 1990 HoF Introduction.

  9. Real quick:

    Name all the guys who the game's real insiders have deemed NFL ready coming out of high school...

    The only legit argument I ever heard was one for Marcus Dupree.

    I once heard Howie Long talk about, as a rookie, going up against Art Shell in practice. It was the classic man vs. boy tale having Shell kick his ass all over the field. And we all know Long eventually became one of the best ever at his position.

    This concept of the NFL drafting HS kids is ludicrous. IF they had a minor league system, it would all make sense. But why would they go to the trouble and expense of creating/managing/marketing a minor league? They already have college ball handling that arm of the entire franchise.

    Let these kids earn money from their own likenesses. If you sell, you earn extra cash. If not, you get to earn your education through your work as an athlete.

    /climbs off soapbox
    Workin' on mysteries without any clues

  10. #10
       
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Kentucky
    Posts
    2,868
    Blog Entries
    32
    Great post Mike. You couldn't possibly be more right.
    Twitter @vancemeek "I wish I could say something classy and inspirational, but that just wouldn't be our style. Pain heals. Chicks dig scars. Glory...lasts forever."-Shane Falco

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •