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Thread: Article: Women in the Locker Room...How would you Feel?

  1. Quote Originally Posted by ScottDCP View Post
    I disagree. I don't think it's a ticking time bomb. At least in the sense of a time bomb being something that can forever and irredeemably end and ruin lives and institutions. In the fifties, maybe, but not today. There is too much awareness these days for much more than boorish behavior to occur in the locker room. And while such behavior can be unpleasant and cause emotional distress for those on the receiving end, I think it's just unlikely. If the players are THAT much of a risk, THAT likely to tear off a reporter's clothes in a populated place, then they are probably doing the same thing elsewhere, where the boss, the other players, reporters, and cameramen are not fifteen feet away. Odds are very good that the players are at or near best behavior while at the office. There have been a few flareups in the last twenty years - Lenny Dykstra, Ms. Olsen (can't recall her name just yet, but she went a long way towards making sure this stuff isn't likely to happen again), and a few others, but if it's happening, it'll get out. Too much access for it not to be the case.
    Read "Boys will be Boys" by Jeff Perlman and pay close attention to the chapter about Charles Haley. All it takes is one guy.

  2. #22
       
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    Quote Originally Posted by FootballFan View Post
    Read "Boys will be Boys" by Jeff Perlman and pay close attention to the chapter about Charles Haley.
    Yes, but you use as the example, a guy who is a time bomb, without much ticking, or really much time. He did this stuff everywhere, and it had very little to do with testosterone.

  3. #23
    And think about this: What if a "fake" female sportswriter goes in the locker room and catches a famous player nude, and you tubes them? This is a you tube world and sick people would do anything to get noticed these days. To eliminate things like that from happening, wait 30 minutes, or how ever long it takes for all of the athletes to get dressed, and then allow them into the locker room.
    I know you're arguing limiting access for both genders, but c'mon. A "fake" male sportswriter could theoretically do the same thing.

    And female reporters who go into those locker rooms should dress accordingly and professional. They shouldn't wear "come and get it" clothes in the locker rooms. Now the athletes should be respectful of the female reporters, regardless of what they wear, but the female reporters shouldn't dress like their going to a nightclub.
    Wasn't Inez Sainz wearing a t-shirt and jeans? Sure, it sounds like she's no Pam Oliver, but it doesn't sound like she was ready for the nightclub or, the way some people make her sound, the street corner.

  4. Quote Originally Posted by ScottDCP View Post
    Yes, but you use as the example, a guy who is a time bomb, without much ticking, or really much time. He did this stuff everywhere, and it had very little to do with testosterone.
    Ok - I take back the "ticking time bomb waiting to happen" phrase, I get it, you don't like it. What do you suggest? Walking a razor's edge? It's no a problem at all? I think female reporters in a male locker room is a potentially volatile situation that can result in bad things, which can be easily avoided by simply keeping all reporters out of the locker room and setting up a simple, uniform schedule for media access outside the locker room. instead of time windows as suggested - How about if media get 1/2 hour to put in requests to the team PR guy for who they want interviewed post game - and that guy comes out to the media room when they're ready? The third string fullback who played on kick coverage shouldn't really have to stick around and sit in a corner if nobody want's to talk to them from the media.

    Does anyone know of any women's sport where male reporters are allowed into the locker room and are privy to women taking showers? Changing? Unclothed?

    Of course there is a degree of professionalism that everyone is expected to abide by.

    I don't know guys, I think this is one very clear example of where equal rights needs to be balanced w/ privacy and some kind of common sense. Female reporters want the same type of access to players that male reporters get in the NFL? Fine - level the playing field OUTSIDE the locker room, not inside.

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    Am I the only dinosaur on this site that believes in dressing for the situation (reporter) and acting like you belong there (football players in question)? For crying out loud, a really low cut shirt and jeans that needed an assistant to help put them on is not what a pro wears. The argument that these are clothes that women wear every day are moot due to the fact that most people aren't professional journalists interviewing million dollar athletes in a billion dollar business setting. At no point in the history has it been OK to harass a woman. At no point in history has it been acceptable to bait the opposite sex into attention, and then choose the type of attention you get. Life isn't pick and choose.

    As far as a solution? Maybe a dress code like any other white collar workplace. The men need to be dressed appropriately (reporters in suit and ties, or at least polo's and khakis), and the women need to be as well (skirts and dresses no more than 3 inches above the knee). That isn't draconian, just common sense. It always takes two idiots to screw up something that isn't broke. In this case it was the idiot(s) that started whistling at women in the workplace, and the other idiot that wore provocative clothing. The argument that a t-shirt and jeans aren't provocative is silly, I've seen jeans and shirts so tight on women that you could see bodily organs.

    When I continue to hear this story, I wonder what this world is coming to. A few immature football players acted like morons, and for the guys that did it, grow up. Act like you've been here before. She isn't the first or last attractive female you will ever see. You happen to be on the clock. Knock it off. For the women that go into ANY business environment and want to use skin to get what they want, be it an interview or a sale, don't be shocked when you draw the wrong attention. It's gonna happen. You will get labeled, and it is your fault. You picked your clothing, and you left the driveway. Nobody else. Own your decision and don't look for pity on national TV.

    Simply put, dress for success and act like you get paid like a responsible adult. That goes for all parties involved.

  6. I'm with ya Fess on all of your points - if that's the way it has to be - interviews inside the locker room.

    Seriously - any ladies out there - if you're the reporter -why the heck would you want to go in there? - a men's locker room? Even a plush, NFL locker room that looks like high roller suite in Vegas or something....rather than a stinky, Staph infested, concrete floor, cage locker room somewhere.

    If the real issue is equal access with male reporters - is it really more desireable to get the interview inside the locker room rather than outside? Why? If you would rather be inside, would you still feel the same going into some DIII 65 year old dank and stinky locker room if you were covering that team for the local paper?

  7. #27
    I'm not a big enough fan of locker room interviews, I guess. If fewer players participated or if they disappeared all together, I wouldn't mind very much at all. So, I'd be all for the 30 minutes of privacy, even if it meant missing an interview or two with my favorite players.

    On a side note, I have seen enough of Ines Sainz(literally and figuratively)!!

  8. #28
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    Locker room interviews are boring, They almost never say anything interesting or entertaining and even when they do there comments are generally blown out of context by someone trying to make a mountain out of a mole hill so that they have a story for the week.

    I really do not see why they are still done.

  9. Personally, I think the post game interview is the biggest waste of time anyways. What do we really find out, it is kind of like the interview at half time with the head coach going into the locker room, both are a waste of time and paper. I think it is wrong for female reporters to be in the locker room, if keeping female reporters out of the locker room, means keeping male reporters out also, so be it, a two hour window for interviews in a separate room makes the most sense, guys can either go straight in or shower first, but they must go in for 15 minutes. If the press does not like it, WHO CARES!?!?!?!?! These guys deserve some privacy and I for one, have no need to know how the feel 2 minutes after leaving the field.

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    I'm sorry guys and I am going with the most basic thing here, I just don't believe that women should be allowed in a mens locker room anymore than male reporters belong in a womens locker room. It is a double standard and I have a problem with that. Are we to believe that women are somehow morally superior to men in these regards and it allows them to not "notice" things for some reason. I don't know about the rest of you, but I work in an environment that is made up primarily of women and when it comes to what would be considered "inappropriate" talk that a man would never get away with without threat of a harassment suit, women regularly cross the line and then some.

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