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Thread: Paul Alexander gone

  1. #11
    FINALLY some good news!

  2. Could keep it in-house ... Kyle Caskey has OL coaching experience, albeit under Paul Alexander ...

  3. Quote Originally Posted by Bengalbro View Post
    Marvin's one great trait is getting good coaches to coach with him. Here is a guy that would be awesome to get.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Harold...ican_football)

    Was OL coach in Indy and Pitt prior to becoming OC.
    See where he played at UM with Everitt and Runyon...then coached Backus, Hutchinson, and Shelton there. But, he also coached Guy-check and Kieft at Central.

    I'll take the over that he is a good coach!

  4. #14
    An outside the box hire (sort of) I wouldn't mind would be the guy who coached the Ohio State O-line in 2014. That line was poor for the Va Tech game, but by the end of the year was the best in college football. They not only pounded Oregon and Alabama, but they didn't have a single holding penalty after the UC game.

  5. #15
    So per Hobson, not only was Alexander in charge of the Oline, he was in charge of the running game as well.


    So I imagine we will also see a new philosophy in the running game.

  6. #16
    I also get the impression that it was either Lazor or Alexander and they chose Lazor. Maybe the two of them didn't mesh philosophically, and scheme wise?

  7. #17
       
    Join Date
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    I didn't know he was "responsible" for the run game

  8. #18
    Here's why I am not gonna miss him - some paragraphs from the si.com article in 2015 that might explain some of what went wrong in 2016 and 2017...:

    https://www.si.com/vault/2016/02/11/lay-it-line

    When Alexander took over the line in 1995, the tinkering continued. "There are two types of pass-blocking techniques," one college line coach recently told a visiting Bengals scout. "The type everyone teaches. And the type the Bengals teach."


    Consider how most tackles block an outside pass rusher, at every level from Pop Warner to the pros. After a couple of kick steps back, the blocker punches the D-end's upper body with both hands to blunt the coming attack, then moves like a basketball player trying to stay in front of his man. But you won't see a Cincinnati lineman punch. "I wasn't a basketball player," Alexander says. "I was a wrestler. We try to use the opponent's momentum against him, which just comes natural from my experience in wrestling."


    Alexander's mantra is, Block your man like a top. Don't put your body in front of a force when you can just as easily deflect it. What he means: Instead of punching out against an outside rusher, as most coaches teach, a Bengals lineman will use what Alexander calls a "pommel technique." The blocker reaches his outside arm outside the defender to slow his rush and disrupt his balance. The lineman then moves his feet in order to close down the separation, smothering the rusher with his entire body. In essence he halts the momentum of the outside-spinning top.

    The same no-punch rule goes for inside pass-rush moves, when the O-lineman's first act goes against just about every manual: He drops his inside hand. Then, when the defender commits to a move—say, a swim or a club—the lineman will lift that inside hand to the defender's chest and put his outside hand into the defender's hip, spinning him around, against his desired momentum.

    Alexander applies similarly unconventional wisdom to zone blocking. Most linemen focus on getting from their initial double team to the linebacker at the next level. But Alexander prefers his linemen to double-team too long rather than leave too early. To practice this, the Bengals work in pairs, shuffling 10 yards downfield with a blocking bag sandwiched between them. Then there's Alexander's invention, the Rogers Lev Sled, a more complicated blocking sled with pads that can be lifted, which helps players develop the proper technique of driving with their hips. It's now the norm on practice fields.

    This kind of creativity is not always immediately embraced. "We always used to butt heads," says Hue Jackson, Cincinnati's offensive coordinator and former running backs coach. "When I was made coordinator [in 2014], we spent some time going over all the ways he taught things. Sitting there with him, it made me realize how good he was. How he teaches, the different props and tools he uses—it's different. But the results are outstanding."
    Some of that verbiage explains why we are saddled with Ogbuehi. I bet Alexander fell in love with his feet and sold him to the draft room. Also, the stuff on how he prefers his zone blockers to wait almost too long before switching to linebackers explains some of Andy getting blown up this year. His scheme can work, I guess, with the right personnel, but it seems awfully complicated. I also wonder how Dallas' veterans will take to having to switch technique...

  9. #19
    Quote Originally Posted by Bengals1181 View Post
    So per Hobson, not only was Alexander in charge of the Oline, he was in charge of the running game as well.


    So I imagine we will also see a new philosophy in the running game.
    FWIW Lapham openly mocks running behind zone blocking against stacked fronts. Claims all you have to do to stop the Bengals running game is go big and add an extra guy. As a result the running game suffers too many negative plays. Thinks the key to unstacking defensive fronts is more throwing to the backs. Example: Green Bay game w/Mixon.

  10. #20
    Quote Originally Posted by HOF View Post
    FWIW Lapham openly mocks running behind zone blocking against stacked fronts. Claims all you have to do to stop the Bengals running game is go big and add an extra guy. As a result the running game suffers too many negative plays. Thinks the key to unstacking defensive fronts is more throwing to the backs. Example: Green Bay game w/Mixon.
    I never got why they didn't use Gio in the passing game more... both he and Mixon are excellent receivers... and for that matter, so was Rex Burkhead.

    I'm sure that Pollack will be studying all of the personnel. It'll be interesting how he looks at Ced and Fisher... if he thinks they have a chance, or if he's cutting the cord.

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