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Thread: Draft Wrap-Up

  1. #11
    Bengals: Draft grades are in

    Mel Kiper, ESPN: B
    Overall, this Cincinnati class lacks star power, but it's solid.
    I could argue that I ranked another center higher than Billy Price where the Bengals took him at No. 21, but what I can't argue is that they had to get a starting center in this draft. And my evaluations of Price and Iowa's James Daniels were close, so this isn't a reach.
    After the first round, the Bengals did a good job not reaching and taking the best players available. Jessie Bates III (pick 54) is a good player with upside. I have compared Sam Hubbard (77) to Rob Ninkovich as a Swiss Army knife-type player with versatility.

    Andy Benoit, MMQB:
    A-

    The Bengals restocked defensive depth in the middle rounds, drafting safety Jessie Bates, end Sam Hubbard and linebacker Malik Jefferson. That replenished depth is extra critical this year because every noted front-seven contributor’s contract, save for Vontaze Burfict’s, Jordan Willis’s and Carl Lawson’s, expires after 2018. Bates will replace Shawn Williams, who is better suited as a movable safety in sub-packages, but that transition may take a year to unfold, given that new defensive coordinator Teryl Austin’s two-deep scheme places a lot of mental burden on safeties.

    Nate Davis, USA Today:
    B

    There may not be a Pro Bowler among C Billy Price, S Jessie Bates, DE Sam Hubbard, LB Malik Jefferson or RB Mark Walton. Yet all could quickly contribute for a franchise that generally doesn't get enough recognition for drafting effectively.

    Vinny Iyer, Sporting News:
    B-

    The Bengals got a good value for a huge need in Price. Hubbard and Jefferson, although not transcendent players, can be key contributors. Cincinnati got good volume and variety, including two intriguing late-rounders in Woodside and Tate. The class is average overall, but it makes up for last year's mess.

    Chris Cannizaro, N.Y. Post:
    B

    The Bengals’ top priority was to improve their offensive line, so they landed Ohio State center Billy Price in the first round. Though Price started all 55 games in college, he’s coming off a pectoral tear and is in rehab, which may have dropped his stock. After Price, the Bengals added to their defense with Wake Forest S Jessie Bates III and Ohio State DE Sam Hubbard in the second and third rounds, respectively.

    Chad Reuter, NFL.com:
    B+

    The skinny: Selecting Price, a center/guard, continues the Bengals' effort to get stronger up front, though I think there could have been more of a difference-maker selected here. The Bengals could have waited and landed a very good interior offensive lineman in the second or third round. Their back-to-back third-rounders -- Hubbard and Jefferson -- beef up their front seven. The games of both guys weren't loved by scouts, but in the third round, these picks make sense. Jefferson could be a particularly good value if everything comes together as he matures. Walton is a well-rounded offensive weapon, presenting good value in the fourth round. I've been a fan of Harris since the fall. I suspect he'll be a very good reserve corner in time. Brown met a need to improve the depth on the defensive line, and could be a steal if he consistently applies his quickness and strength.

    Pro Football Focus:
    Average

  2. #12

    1 (21) Billy Price, C, Ohio State, 83.8
    2 (54) Jessie Bates III, S, Wake Forest, 78.3
    3 (77) Sam Hubbard, Edge, Ohio State, 80.8
    3 (78) Malik Jefferson, LB, Texas, 87.5
    4 (112) Mark Walton, RB, Miami (Fla.), 86.1
    5 (151) Davontae Harris, CB, Illinois State, n/a
    5 (158) Andrew Brown, DI, Virginia, 77.1
    5 (170) Darius Phillips, CB, Western Michigan, 84.2
    7 (249) Logan Woodside, QB, Toledo, 84.1
    7 (252) Rod Taylor, OT, Ole Miss, 83.1
    7 (253) Auden Tate, WR, Florida State, 82.3

    Day 1: The Bengals were rumored to have been targeting a center in the first round, and with our top center, Frank Ragnow, coming off the board right before their pick, they stuck with the need pick with Billy Price. He has experience playing multiple positions at Ohio State, capping his career with two solid years of grading (84.7 in 2016, 83.2 in 2017). Price is aggressive both as a run-blocker and in pass protection, a trait that works both for and against him. He ranked sixth in the draft class with a run-block success percentage of 92.0, but only 27th in pass-blocking efficiency at 97.6.
    Day 2: Jessie Bates is one of few safeties who can hang with receivers in 1-on-1 situations, and he’s made a few spectacular plays when matched up in “quarters” looks. He’s also willing to mix it up in the run game, though he must do a better job of preventing big plays after missing 16 tackles on only 81 attempts last season. Sam Hubbard had a solid career at Ohio State, grading at 83.0 in 2016 and 80.8 last season. He’s done his best work in the run game as his best pass-rush grade of 79.0 came in 2016. Malik Jefferson started to live up to his five-star pedigree last year after struggling in his first two seasons. He ranked 14th in the draft class with a run-stop percentage of 12.1 percent, though he must cut back on the missed tackles after missing 36 on only 250 career attempts.
    Day 3: Mark Walton has a number of spectacular cuts on tape, showing the quickness and speed to be a weapon as both a runner and as a receiver. He posted an excellent 86.1 overall grade last season before going down due to an ankle injury. Andrew Brown posted average grades throughout his career showing through in his 7.6 pass-rush productivity that ranked 28th in the class and his run-stop percentage of 5.6 that ranked 77th. Darius Phillips posted three solid years of grading at corner, picking off 12 passes and breaking up 26 on 206 targets. Logan Woodside is an intriguing backup option as he ranked 11th in big-time throw percentage in the draft class, but only 22nd at avoiding turnover-worthy plays. He posted grades of 86.3 in 2016 and 84.3 in 2017. Auden Tate can do damage in the red zone with his long frame and he ranked sixth in the nation with a 66.7 percent catch rate in contested situations last season.
    Overall grade: Average



    https://www.profootballfocus.com/new...l-draft-grades

  3. #13
    Best 2018 NFL Draft picks for all 32 teams, including Shaquem Griffin to Seahawks

    Cincinnati Bengals


    Malik Jefferson, OLB, Texas (78th pick): He's an athletic freak who could be the latest draft find for the Bengals, who have made a habit out of unearthing fantastic defensive talent after the first round (Geno Atkins, George Iloka and Carl Lawson all come to mind).


    https://www.cbssports.com/nfl/draft/...n-to-seahawks/



  4. #14
    Quote Originally Posted by Bengals1181 View Post
    Bengals: Draft grades are in

    Mel Kiper, ESPN: B
    Overall, this Cincinnati class lacks star power, but it's solid.
    I could argue that I ranked another center higher than Billy Price where the Bengals took him at No. 21, but what I can't argue is that they had to get a starting center in this draft. And my evaluations of Price and Iowa's James Daniels were close, so this isn't a reach.
    After the first round, the Bengals did a good job not reaching and taking the best players available. Jessie Bates III (pick 54) is a good player with upside. I have compared Sam Hubbard (77) to Rob Ninkovich as a Swiss Army knife-type player with versatility.

    Andy Benoit, MMQB:
    A-

    The Bengals restocked defensive depth in the middle rounds, drafting safety Jessie Bates, end Sam Hubbard and linebacker Malik Jefferson. That replenished depth is extra critical this year because every noted front-seven contributor’s contract, save for Vontaze Burfict’s, Jordan Willis’s and Carl Lawson’s, expires after 2018. Bates will replace Shawn Williams, who is better suited as a movable safety in sub-packages, but that transition may take a year to unfold, given that new defensive coordinator Teryl Austin’s two-deep scheme places a lot of mental burden on safeties.

    Nate Davis, USA Today:
    B

    There may not be a Pro Bowler among C Billy Price, S Jessie Bates, DE Sam Hubbard, LB Malik Jefferson or RB Mark Walton. Yet all could quickly contribute for a franchise that generally doesn't get enough recognition for drafting effectively.

    Vinny Iyer, Sporting News:
    B-

    The Bengals got a good value for a huge need in Price. Hubbard and Jefferson, although not transcendent players, can be key contributors. Cincinnati got good volume and variety, including two intriguing late-rounders in Woodside and Tate. The class is average overall, but it makes up for last year's mess.

    Chris Cannizaro, N.Y. Post:
    B

    The Bengals’ top priority was to improve their offensive line, so they landed Ohio State center Billy Price in the first round. Though Price started all 55 games in college, he’s coming off a pectoral tear and is in rehab, which may have dropped his stock. After Price, the Bengals added to their defense with Wake Forest S Jessie Bates III and Ohio State DE Sam Hubbard in the second and third rounds, respectively.

    Chad Reuter, NFL.com:
    B+

    The skinny: Selecting Price, a center/guard, continues the Bengals' effort to get stronger up front, though I think there could have been more of a difference-maker selected here. The Bengals could have waited and landed a very good interior offensive lineman in the second or third round. Their back-to-back third-rounders -- Hubbard and Jefferson -- beef up their front seven. The games of both guys weren't loved by scouts, but in the third round, these picks make sense. Jefferson could be a particularly good value if everything comes together as he matures. Walton is a well-rounded offensive weapon, presenting good value in the fourth round. I've been a fan of Harris since the fall. I suspect he'll be a very good reserve corner in time. Brown met a need to improve the depth on the defensive line, and could be a steal if he consistently applies his quickness and strength.

    Pro Football Focus:
    Average

    Most gave the Bengals draft a grade of B. Seems about right. Using a first rounder on a center fills a need but you're not going to get many plus grades when you draft a player at #21 whose draft ceiling was #21. Simply put, there was no trick to getting Price at that spot. No skill or luck involved. It wasn't even best case scenario. Instead, what it turned out to be is a solid need pick at a devalued position. A grade of B seems generous.

    That said, the rest of the draft was more impressive IMO. The Bengals had made it clear in free agency that getting a ball hawking FS was a priority and by all accounts they got a very good one in the 2nd round. Best, they traded down and in the process improved a pick in the 3rd round.

    And there's the rub because IMO the two 3rd round picks made the draft. For Bengal fans who wanted a more instinctive LB than Malik Jefferson try reminding yourself how you got Billy Price instead of Rashaan Evans. And for those who wanted a better pass rusher than Sam Hubbard try reminding yourself how little you wanted an elite prospect that would have required an earlier pick. Getting Hubbard in the 3rd round was both a compromise and outstanding value.

    As for the rest, you can argue and quibble each pick but I think most complaints will argue more Oline help should have been added at all costs. Myself, I always hated the paint-by-numbers draft approach that argued each early pick needed to be an offensive lineman. Rather, I thought this teams defense was in dire need of an infusion of talent everywhere, and I liked what they did after the 1st round so much that I actually like the Price pick better now than when it was made.

    Overall Draft Grade - B

  5. #15
    ESPN’s Mel Kiper gave the Bengals the 12th highest grade of any NFL team for its draft haul with a mark of a B.

  6. #16
    A grade of B seems about right.

    Felt like they were pretty conservative and hit a lot of "singles" with no big swings for the fences. Nothing wrong with that, though as a fan, one really high upside shot at some point would have been fun.

    The tidbit about the Bengals trying to move up into the 3rd for a guy with some character concerns is really interesting and the Arden Key speculation makes a lot of sense. Interesting to think of what the draft would look like if they pulled the trigger on that deal (presumably at the cost of 4th and a 5th rounder) and basically traded Mark Walton and Andrew Brown for Arden Key. The class overall would have a lot different look in terms of risk/reward.

    Edit to add: My favorite thing about the class is how high-character most of the guys are. I don't think there will be any drama at all and a lot of the scouting reports featured "high motor" as a description. Based upon the 2017roster that arguably had some "softness" on the OL and maybe a few too many high-maitenance types, I think the professionalism of the team got an upgrade. Something intangible that should be a real positive moving forward, assuming some of these guys can play and we get a few starters from the group.
    Last edited by happyrid; 04-29-2018 at 12:40 PM.

  7. #17
    Quote Originally Posted by Bengals1181 View Post
    ESPN’s Mel Kiper gave the Bengals the 12th highest grade of any NFL team for its draft haul with a mark of a B.
    That's a very positive grade considering he ranked Price as the 3rd best center. I was expecting more criticism of the Bates pick due to the other names still available, but the Bengals got the guy they wanted and it's hard to call it a reach after the Bengals traded back. Marvin said Jefferson wouldn't be there at #100 and I don't disagree. Coach him up and use him correctly and I think he can be very good. Resist the temptation to use him in open space. Use Lawson when you want to attack the pocket. Jefferson can't change directions well and backs knew it. But put him in a run and chase role and he can make every play.

    As for Sam Hubbard, I honestly don't think you could do better at DE in the 3rd round. Rashaan Green maybe. Maybe not. But it's hard to knock Hubbard"s lack of elite qualities knowing the way this team invests in defensive lineman. And same for Andrew Brown.

    I like this draft.

  8. #18
    Field GullsVerified account @FieldGulls now28 seconds agoMore



    kinda interesting:this 2018 nfl mock draft from the big lead right after last year's draft has Sam Hubbard and Malik Jefferson going in the top 10. Hubbard and Jefferson ended up going 77th and 78th, back-to-back picks by the Bengals.








  9. #19
    After defensive draft, Bengals turn OL over to Pollack

    Paul Dehner Jr., pdehnerjr@enquirer.comPublished 9:38 p.m. ET April 28, 2018 | Updated 10:28 p.m. ET April 28, 2018



    Cincinnati Enquirer beat writers Paul Dehner Jr. and Jim Owczarski wrap up the Bengals 2018 NFL Draft picks from Paul Brown Stadium. (Sam Greene/The Enquirer)




    (Photo: Kareem Elgazzar)


    When walking off the press conference podium on Thursday night glowing from the pick of first-round center Billy Price, offensive coordinator Bill Lazor joked the plan was to be back down there with offensive line coach Frank Pollack again Friday night.

    As the finishing touches were put on 11 Bengals picks, deep into a frenzied Saturday evening, Pollack would never be seen again by the media as this offseason focused on fixing the line suddenly stopped in its tracks in the first round.

    Six of the next seven choices came on the increasingly crowded defensive side of the ball.

    LIVE PODCAST: Director of player personnel Duke Tobin joins BBP on Monday, 7 p.m., live at Fifty West Brewing Company
    ANALYSIS: Trade sets off Friday of defense
    BENGALS DRAFT: Breaking down all 11 picks

    There was no potential tackle of the future. Nobody to compete at guard. No versatile swing piece to develop with Cedric Ogbuehi and Jake Fisher in contract years and still yet to prove they can hack it as full-time starters in this league.

    The Bengals board didn’t fall that way and they weren’t going to pass on defensive players rated far higher for offensive line guys.

    “You can’t create one,” Marvin Lewis said of offensive linemen. “It showed you the void of how many there were. There were very few.”

    The Bengals are one of many teams in this league that have seen back-to-back weak tackle classes diminish replacements. But this stands out because of this being the primary thrust of this team’s offseason.

    The Bengals second and third round picks talk in their first press conference at Paul Brown Stadium. (Sam Greene/The Enquirer



    So, at the end of four months of fixing the trenches, the first move made turns out to be the most important: You’re on, Mr. Pollack. He begins the development process on the field Monday.

    Lewis says they knew it ultimately had to be this way.

    “Unless you had two or three first-round picks (you aren't) going to come in here and fix an offensive line for an NFL season anyway,” he said. “When you say things like that – that’s unrealistic unless you have three first-round picks to go pick three first-round linemen who are going to come in here and be better than anybody you got. It’s up to those guys in the building. This is not a one-person thing. We had another good coach. We have another very good coach and we are excited about that. It’s us, the players, it’s our coaching, it’s what we do. That all fixes what we have to get done and be better at.”

    Pollack will be charged with showing he can pull the talent out of Fisher that made him a second-round pick in 2015. He’ll need to prove he can groom late-2017 risers Christian Westerman or Alex Redmond or another into a quality starter at right guard. These are two players who couldn’t get active for two years before creating a swell of momentum for themselves the final two weeks of the season.

    He’ll also need help from Cordy Glenn, proving the ankle injury that kept him out of 16 games the last two years will be a thing of the past and the irregular heartbeat that ended Fisher’s 2017 after nine games won’t resurface.

    All this while molding a rookie center and new combinations up and down the line into a brand new system he’s installing.

    Otherwise, the right side of the offensive line, in particular, will look a lot like last year’s offensive line. And the one thing everyone can agree on is nobody wants the offensive line to look like last year’s version.


    Would a pick of a tackle in the third round or guard in the fourth have changed the challenging dynamic of this reconstruction? Not really. But it would have offered another layer of insurance and protection.

    Lazor looks at a roster with players who played guard for them last year between Trey Hopkins, T.J. Johnson, Clint Boling, Westerman and Redmond with confidence. That’s part of why guard didn’t move up the priority list this weekend.

    “We have four guards who have played, count T.J. Johnson (now predominantly center), have five guys who played in games last year,” the offensive coordinator said. “I would be absolutely shocked if we didn’t get good guard play somewhere out of those five.”


    Lewis said the plan was always to address the defense in the middle rounds. They viewed that as a power center of these three days. Only running back Mark Walton (fourth round) slipped in between six defenders. There wasn’t a spot in their eyes to address a tackle position until taking Ole Miss’ Rod Taylor in the final picks of the draft.

    “We had (tackle options) at different levels,” Lazor said. “You have to fill a whole team. If your guy doesn’t line up with the one you are picking, where you had him rated, you understand them taking a different position instead.”

    Cincinnati Bengals head coach Marvin Lewis, who was re-signed to a two-year deal through the 2019 season, and offensive coordinator Bill Lazor, answer questions from reporters, Wednesday, Jan. 3, 2018, at Paul Brown Stadium in Cincinnati. (Photo: Kareem Elgazzar/The Enquirer)


    That’s part of why they make a move for Bobby Hart, the 23-year-old they inked to a cheap, one-year deal from the Giants. They could use him, taking advantage as a change-of-scenery player who was cast away due to poor play and new management looking to change the culture.
    In reality, he’s not an answer yet, just another project on Pollack’s plate.

    The Bengals believed they needed a new voice and vision in the room. They have it. By all early returns, the response has been great to his enthusiastic style.

    Selecting only one offensive lineman in their primary eight put more emphasis on Pollack's message and the growth of existing personnel for the 2018 campaign.

    The acquisitions of Glenn and Price were aggressive and focused. They deserved to be applauded. Stopping there applies pressure to those who were a part of the failure last season.

    With the drumbeat of the “win-now” message reverberating through the front offices of Paul Brown Stadium, in nobody’s room does it bang louder than Pollack’s.

    “When a position coach changes there is always uncertainty, people learning each other, it’s a very natural time to say. 'hey we need to be better than where we were as an offense'” Lazor said. “We need to be better than we were as an offensive line. Some of the answer is guys who are still here. So, it’s up to you.”


    https://www.cincinnati.com/story/spo...ack/562297002/


  10. #20
    Cincinnati Bengals: B Grade

    Goals Entering the 2018 NFL Draft: The Bengals traded for Cordy Glenn, but they need to continue to repair their atrocious offensive line. The decline in blocking ability is the primary reason why Cincinnati struggled so much in 2017, so that needs to be addressed. The Bengals should also consider drafting a quarterback to potentially replace the disappointing Andy Dalton.

    2018 NFL Draft Accomplishments: Cincinnati wanted Frank Ragnow, but the Lions selected him one pick earlier. Luckily for the Bengals, they also loved Billy Price as a prospect, so they were able to select him 21st overall. Price tore his pectoral at the combine, but recent medical reports suggested that he would be ready by August, if not earlier. Price, as a result, should be Cincinnati's day-one starter at center.

    I thought the Bengals would make more upgrades to the offensive line, but they didn't draft another blocker until the seventh round. This was a mistake, but Cincinnati at least obtained some other talented players. Defensive end Sam Hubbard, chosen 77th overall, was expected by some to be a first-round pick. Hubbard has great potential, but was very inconsistent at Ohio State. He presented great value in the third round. Jessie Bates, chosen a bit earlier, should provide a much-needed upgrade at safety.

    Cincinnati found some nice bargains on Day 3 as well. Running back Mark Walton and defensive tackle Andrew Brown were both solid choices. I wasn't as crazy about third-rounder Malik Jefferson, whose passion for football has been questioned. However, Jefferson earned the only grade worse than a "B" outside of Round 7.

    It seems like the Bengals came away with a decent haul this year, as several players from this class figure to make impactful contributions in 2018. I just wish more energy was spent on the offensive line.


    Read more: http://walterfootball.com/nfldraftgr...#ixzz5E30iRcq2





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