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Thread: Rookie Minicamp this weekend

  1. #11
    Pretty funny also that Auden Tate has #19... just like Brandon (Tate) used to have. I took a double-take when I saw it.

  2. #12
    Flowers looks to bloom in a new spot

    Posted May 11, 2018
    Geoff HobsonEditorBengals.com


    Quinton Flowers makes the move from QB to RB this weekend.
    Quinton Flowers, who once threw a pass to Chad Johnson early in his career as one of the greatest quarterbacks Miami ever produced, is soon to take a handoff from quarterback Andy Dalton at some point as one of the Bengals’ more intriguing experiments.
    Not this weekend, of course, when only the rookies gather for the weekend minicamp that begins with Friday afternoon’s practice. And maybe not until training camp, when the numbers and the reps and the day of the week play havoc with the rotation.
    When Flowers got over the disappointment of not getting drafted two weeks ago, well, it wasn’t the first time the fates had pulled a reverse. He’s wearing No. 34 and the Bengals list him as a running back for the first time in his life after signing him in free agency. But he’ll end up in more positions than an Olympic gymnast. Start at running back, slide over to returner and go from there.
    As always, he’s challenged, grateful, determined, resilient all at the same time.
    “I was surprised by that. After everything I did in college, all the records … staying out of trouble … you thought I’d be one of those guys that get drafted,” Flowers says. “Things didn’t go as planned, so you keep pushing ahead. In life, you have to have the right mindset. I’ve always had faith in God and that’s one thing I’ll always say. He never made a mistake. That gets me through. Everything happens for a reason. I just told myself God did it for a reason. So after the draft, I just sat back and the Bengals were the first team to text me and they wanted me to be a part of the organization and I talked to my agent and we made it happen.”
    When Bengals equipment managers Adam Knollman, Sam Staley and Tyler Runk hung 34 in his very rookiesh portable metal locker, it wasn’t the first time the Bengals had given him anything.
    Chad Johnson, their all-time leading receiver, used to outfit Flowers’ Little League team, the Liberty City Optimists. That was back when Reebok sponsored the NFL and sometimes when the Bengals had a bye week Johnson would show up with some boxes. Everyone would get a towel, or gloves, or maybe cleats that were all the same color. Johnson would also jump in on 7-on-7 and it was during some of those practices the blooming Flowers might throw a few passes to him.
    “Chad was always talking trash, having fun with the kids,” Flowers says. “He was always keeping a smile on the kids’ faces. He likes to have fun. He still has that kid’s mentality.”
    But Flowers never really had a chance to be a kid.
    By the time Bengals running backs coach Kyle Caskey went to watch him at the South Florida pro day, he knew the story that emerged from Miami’s daunting patch of turf in Liberty City. Hell, everyone in the country knew.
    At seven, Flowers lost his father Nathaniel to a fluke drive-by shooting moments after he was sitting on his lap. At 17 he lost his mother Nancy to cancer. The next year, the day before his first college start for South Florida, he lost his step-brother in another of those mindless, inexplicable shootings from on the street that fill a police blotter after he intervened to protect a group of children.

    Running backs coach Kyle Caskey made sure he kept in touch with Flowers before the draft.
    So how Flowers resurrected the Bulls’ program with character topping a laundry list of intangibles despite his personal life in tatters became required reading leading up to the draft. Plus, after the Bengals’ season ended Caskey acquainted himself with the scouting reports compiled by Bengals Southeast scout and offensive connoisseur Mike Potts that were cross-checked by East Coast scout Andrew Johnson. It all gave him a good feeling.
    “I didn’t bring it up with him as much because I wanted him to understand that I’m looking at him as an athlete and I wanted him to talk to me as a coach,” Caskey says of the past. “When it came to his personality and how he is as a person, no one had a bad thing to say about him.”
    The man isn’t a mystery. That’s as good as it gets. But his position in the NFL is another matter. Flowers is 5-10, 214 pounds and, as Potts says, “Magic with the ball in his hands.” Running the zone read and the Bulls’ spread offense, he did what Tim Tebow didn’t do and became the first Florida college quarterback to rush for 1,000 yards and throw for 2,000 yards. As a junior. He fell seven yards shy of doing it again last season. All the while leading South Florida out of the abyss at 21-4.
    Problem is, those skills and dimensions fit into the NFL but not at quarterback. That’s why Tebow is trying to hit the curve. So the Bengals aren’t going to put Flowers in a box, they’re going to go out of the box and try him at everything. If he’s not a laser passer, he certainly is a bonfire of skills.
    Caskey gets first crack at Flowers in a backfield wide open after Joe Mixon, Giovani Bernard and Mark Walton. Special teams coordinator Darrin Simmons is waiting to use him as a returner. And he’s tailor made to be a personal punt protector with his quarterback background. Wide receivers coach Bob Bicknell, who also saw him at the pro day, can run him in the slot. Offensive coordinator Bill Lazor won’t put his zone read skills on the shelf.
    What if they’ve got a Lamar Jackson-type after the Ravens traded back up into the first round to get Jackson? Then defensive coordinator Teryl Austin can use Flowers on the scout team the two weeks they prepare for Baltimore.
    And in the back of the mind there has to be that observation from South Florida head coach Charlie Strong that Flowers has all the makings of a play-making NFL safety.
    “The first step is getting him in the building,” Caskey says. “Now that we’ve got him here we’ll see what he can do and how we can fit him in to help us and help his career.”
    Flowers isn’t giving up the dream of playing NFL quarterback. It’s why he walked off a field as a kid when a coach put him on the offensive line. It’s why he went to South Florida. But there are dreams and there is the path to a dream and he says he wants to get on a roster and go from there.

    Flowers gives offensive coordinator Bill Lazor a variety of options.
    “I kind of figured that’s the way it would go,” says Flowers of the conversion to running back. “At the end of the day I can’t keep saying I want a shot at quarterback. Some people feel certain ways about me, but I don’t get caught up in all that hype. I’m just being myself. Do whatever it takes to help the team win.”
    The recruiting of Flowers is another example of how director of player personnel Duke Tobin’s department works with the coaching staff and agents during evaluations. As the Bengals coaches prepared for their scouting season to meet the prospects, Caskey watched Flowers jump off the tape compared to his running backs.
    Plus, the Bengals had an early opening to Flowers in January’s East-West Shrine Game, where three offensive assistants watched him work during the week. Offensive assistant Dan Pitcher was his quarterbacks coach, assistant offensive line coach Robert Couch coached his tight ends and tight ends coach Jonathan Hayes was his head coach. Flowers didn’t play in the game because he had to go back home for personal reasons but they had seen enough to like.
    A month later the Bengals met him at the scouting combine and watched him work as a quarterback. Then Caskey gave Flowers a call before his pro day to let him know he would be sticking around to watch him work out as a running back. Caskey loves how Flowers believes he can be a quarterback and how he exudes that Alpha air. He thinks that confidence projects anywhere on the field.
    “It was impressive how he made the conversion with his mindset,” Caskey says. “Here he is throwing for the scouts and then all of a sudden he’s working out for them playing another positon and he really handled that part well.”
    Caskey kept in touch with Flowers and his agent, Zach Hiller, with the occasional text and call in the weeks before the draft. But during the draft Caskey, expecting him to get picked, didn’t get on the phone until he noticed almost off-handedly moments after the draft that Flowers was still there. The draft is so strait-jacketed for three days before it melts into an hour of chaos with free agency, but Caskey already had a relationship with Flowers and Hiller and the thing was done fairly quickly.
    “It was a different environment over there,” Flowers says of the Bengals. “They kept checking in with me to see how I was doing. The coach told me stay upbeat and be positive.”
    Flowers also came to terms with playing running back and how taking a handoff is different than keeping it on a zone read. Or is it? Before he arrived in Cincinnati Thursday for camp he phoned one of his old college running backs, Marlon Mack, now running the ball for the Colts. Mack told him to get ready. The league is fast. But he also told Flowers he could do it because he picked up things so quickly as a quarterback.
    “I just have to get a feel for it. Let my instincts take over,” Flowers says. “I think that’s why I was able to be the best I can be. Once I get a feel for things I just let my instincts take over. In college I watched film and I practiced like it was a game because you never know what’s going to happen in a game.
    “The hardest adjustment will be picking up blocks. I’ve never done it. Reading the holes better instead of dropping back and if it’s not there just get outside and use my talent. Now I just have to hit the gaps and trust the O-line.”

    Tight ends coach Jonathan Hayes was Flowers' head coach at an all-star game back in January.
    If there’s anyone who can talk about what Flowers is about to embark on, it’s Shaun King, his quarterbacks coach his junior year before moving over to running backs last season. Yes, that Shaun King. The Tulane quarterback taken with the 50th pick by the Buccaneers 20 drafts ago.
    How tough does Flowers have it trying to prove to people he’s an NFL quarterback? King was 6-1, 215 pounds and people just couldn’t get over his size even though he took the Bucs to the 2000 playoffs with a 10-6 record. He started three games the rest of his career that lasted just six seasons.
    Is he an NFL running back?
    “I think Quinton is an NFL player,” King says. “When we’re evaluating, we get so caught up in measurables. At the end of the day they’re going to blow a whistle and play a game and the only thing that’s going to matter is who loves the game, who prepares the most consistently, who has the most heart and Quinton grades off the charts in all those categories. People talk about tall cornerbacks. Look at the first round this year and people drafted great football players.
    “That’s how we are as a society. We get caught up in the superficial,” King says. “Look at Aaron Donald. Some people thought he was too short. But look at his college tape with the Pitt Panthers. Quinton is going to be an asset to the Bengals and the Cincinnati community. He’ll make that offense so much more dynamic … You’ve got your big Pro Bowl receiver in A.J. Green, a proven veteran quarterback in Andy Dalton. You’ve got different kinds of backs. He’s a perfect complement.”
    King is amazed Flowers didn’t get drafted. “Are you telling me after the fifth round all those guys are better players than Quinton Flowers?”
    But he’s got faith in the Bengals coaches.
    “They have brilliant offensive minds,” King says. “I think he can throw the football, I think he can catch the football, I think he can carry the football. He’s a phenomenal football player. If you put him in a box I think you limit your offense’s ability.
    “I think about the red zone packages they might be able to use him as a quarterback with a change of pace with the run-pass option and he can make the throws. You could have him as a slot receiver, or as a returner, or put him in the backfield. There are so many things you can do with the young man.”
    After watching Flowers for two years, King’s belief that things happen for a reason has been bolstered by him taming all kinds of adversity. From getting up from big hits to manufacturing yards out of plays melting into chaos to the biggest losses of all.
    It almost seems as if Flowers’ everything-happens-for-reason iron will is contagious.


    “I think Quinton’s life is pre-ordained,” King says. “I think God has a mission for him on and off the field and I think it was God’s will he ended up in Cincinnati and that’s why he’s there.”


    http://www.bengals.com/news/article-1/Flowers-looks-to-bloom-in-a-new-spot/ed750f9c-ac09-4b09-b306-6743de095632

  3. #13
    Quick hits: Small world for Bates; Flowers busy; Put Price in No. 53; Four picks sign

    Posted May 11, 2018
    Geoff HobsonEditorBengals.comFollow Me Blog





    Jessie Bates found some familiar faces in the locker room.
    -Billy Price couldn’t wear his Ohio State number of 54 because it’s retired for the first Bengal ever drafted in center Bob Johnson. So the team wanted him to go a slot down to No. 53.
    No problem for the Bengals’ first-round pick
    “Stay in my lane. Go to work,” said Price with a shrug as the rookies broke for lunch Friday before their first practice of minicamp.
    Price was surprised by one item hanging in his temporary locker in the annex of the locker room reserved for first-year players.
    “Hey, I’ve got a helmet,” he said as he mashed it on his head.
    But he won’t be wearing it for real until training camp as he continues to rehab from surgery on his partially torn pectoral muscle …
    -Department of It’s a Small World After All: Second-round pick Jessie Bates III, the safety from Wake Forest, found himself lockering next to seventh-round pick Auden Tate, the wide receiver from Florida State.
    “He caught the game-winning touchdown against us,” said Bates of Tate’s 40-yard catch down the middle last September in the last minute to pull out a back-and-forth game.
    No, Bates wasn’t covering him. (“He was going outside the majority of time where I was inside in the slot playing man-to-man.”). But it was quite a tussle just the same. Bates and Tate already knew each other before that day from playing against each other in years past and following each other on Instagram. (“Just from playing each other. That’s out of respect. He’s a hell of a player.”) But that didn’t stop Tate from drilling Bates with a blind-side block.
    “We were joking about that,” said Bates with a laugh. “I’m going to get him.”
    Not only that, Bates is rooming with another seventh-rounder, Toledo quarterback Logan Woodside. Bates, out of Fort Wayne, Indiana, had actually committed to Toledo when Woodside was the quarterback but opted for Wake Forest when the offer came a week before signing day.
    Woodside hasn’t forgotten.
    “When he got drafted I was pretty sure he was following me (on social media) and got my number and called me the next day,” said Bates, who knows Woodside is a good find for the media. “You’ll get to know that guy. He’s a character.” …
    -Woodside, from nearby Frankfort, Ky., showed up for the second time at Paul Brown Stadium. He says the first time was for a Browns game way back in the day to see University of Kentucky’s Tim Couch quarterback Cleveland …
    -As advertised, the Bengals wasted no time with undrafted South Florida free agent Quinton Flowers. The highly-decorated quarterback is listed as a running back but has been told he’ll start out playing both with the emphasis on running back as well as giving returning a try.
    He has checked out the tape of some other college QBs that ended up playing other positions, such as a pair of wide receivers in Antwan Randle-El and Randall Cobb.
    “You can get some positive energy from those guys,” Flowers said …
    -Undrafted free agent Ja’Von Rolland-Jones, out of Arkansas State, came within a half sack of Arizona State’s Terrell Suggs’ collegiate record for career sacks. But 43.5 is still pretty good. One of the reasons he signed with Cincinnati is that his defensive line coach in the East-West Shrine Game was Bengals assistant linebackers coach Marcus Lewis, whose specialty is the spin move.
    “It was factor. He’s a great coach,” Rolland-Jones said. “He kind of got me to clean up some of it. I haven’t perfected it yet. It’s coming.”
    He can’t wait until the veterans hit town because he wants to pick left end Carlos Dunlap’s brain. He has already heisted one of Dunlap’s moves off film.
    “The way he uses the stab chop,” Rolland-Jones said. “You stab the inner pec (the shoulder) and then wipe away the other arm. I’d love to learn from watching him do it in practice.”
    Arkansas State is the home of one of the all-time Bengals’ greats, linebacker Bill Bergey. But that 1969 draft he was taken with the 31st pick is nearly 50 years ago.
    -The Bengals signed four of their 11 draft picks before Friday's practice Woodside and fellow seventh-rounder Rod Taylor, a guard from Ole Miss, as well as fifth-rounders Davontae Harris, Illinois State cornerback, and Virginia defensive tackle Andrew Brown.




    http://www.bengals.com/news/article-...7-6c89a0e077ce





  4. #14
    Notebook: Rookie backer eyes Tez as camp breaks; Home base

    Posted 18 hours ago
    Geoff HobsonEditorBengals.comFollow Me Blog





    Eyes of the rookies are on Vontaze Burfict.
    The Bengals finished off their rookie minicamp in Sunday’s one-hour workout but they’ll be back at Paul Brown Stadium Monday morning to mix with the veterans in their workouts for the first time.
    That’s when Connecticut middle linebacker Junior Joseph, an undrafted rookie, is hoping to meet another undrafted linebacker. The 6-0, 229-pound Joseph, a top 15 tackler in Huskies history, hopes to glean some tips from Vontaze Burfict.
    “I watched him last year. I watched him a lot last year. I’d watch (the Bengals) on prime time and he stood out,” Joseph said this weekend. “He’s aggressive, physical. That’s the type of linebacker I am. Aggressive, physical down-hill player. Burfict and NaVorro Bowman are the two guys in the NFL that I’m a fan of.”
    Joseph comes out of pro-style program headed by UConn coach Randy Edsall, a Tom Coughlin disciple. So you know he comes with a hard nose.
    “You have to be aggressive to play this game,” Joseph said. “If I have the opportunity I hope to learn a lot from (Burfict). Hopefully come Monday I’ll get a chance to talk to him. I was thinking coming in here that it’s kind of cool being on his team. And being able to ask him about certain things on the field and how it can help my game.”
    _Home is where the heart is. Undrafted rookie wide receiver Devonte Boyd is one of the greatest receivers in the history of UNLV after going to high school in nearby Henderson, Nev. But he asked the Bengals to change his hometown on the roster from Henderson to New Orleans.
    He was ten years old living on the West Bank of the Crescent City when Hurricane Katrina hit and his family was forced to live in Houston for a year. When they returned a year later, Boyd decided a few years after that to live with his uncle in Henderson.
    But New Orleans is home.
    “That’s where I grew up,” Boyd said. “I still consider that home. My whole family is still there.”



    http://www.bengals.com/news/article-...a-b5b120a7117c


  5. #15
    Worley fitting right in

    Posted May 13, 2018
    Geoff HobsonEditorBengals.comFollow Me Blog





    Chris Worley at work this weekend.
    If you’re a Bengals fan, what is there not to like about rookie linebacker Chris Worley? And forget that he’s one of four rookies at minicamp this weekend from The Ohio State or that he’s from Ohio or that he helped the Buckeyes win a national title.
    Try that while growing up in Cleveland he delighted enraging his family by rooting for the Bengals against the Browns. Or try that his favorite Bengal back then was wide receiver Chad Johnson because despite the histrionics he always showed up to beat you. Or try that he knows all about the Bengals being born because the Browns fired a head coach named Paul Brown.
    “Ridiculous but, hey, people make mistakes,” Worley said upon his arrival “Organizations make mistakes.”
    The Bengals didn’t make the mistake of judging Worley merely on his athleticism and his measurables, which is one of the opinions why fellow Buckeye backer Jerome Baker went to the Texans in the third round while Worley had to wait for the Bengals to win a bidding war after the draft that made him their highest paid college free agent for what is believed to be about $13,000.
    The Bengals looked past the numbers and focused on Worley’s crafty instincts formed in 50 games for the Buckeyes. Not to mention his penchant for physical play and ability to fit into the Bengals scheme at both SAM and WILL right now and the middle later.
    “Tough. Hard-nosed. High motor,” said Billy Price, the Ohio State center the Bengals took in the first round, when asked for a scouting report. “Smaller guy. Especially when you look at linebackers, but a guy who gives you his all. One of these pesky linebackers who just keeps coming back. I’m glad he’s on my side.”
    If that’s not enough of a reason to like Worley then you have to love the fact that the Bengals have secured some of their best linebackers in the Marvin Lewis Era through college free agency. That’s how Vincent Rey (2010) and Vontaze Burfict (2012) got here and if you listen closely people talk about Worley the same way.
    Smart. Versatile. Did we say tough?
    “Tough. Physical. Took over from day one,” said linebacker coach Jim Haslett after day two. “I like him.”
    That made it easy for Haslett to recruit him hard and he’s a big reason Worley is here.
    “Coach Haslett talked to me through the whole process. I came down here for a visit. He came up there for pro day,” Worley said of that Columbus job fair that produced seven draft picks. “It came down to needs. It came down to scheme of things. Like how they run some of the same things as Ohio State.
    “I thought this was a better fit for me personally. I love the coaching they have here. Coach Haslett was a big deciding factor.”

    Chris Worley became a Buckeye staple in 50 games.
    When the last day of the draft rolled around, Worley’s name frequently surfaced and if they hadn’t grabbed Texas linebacker Malik Jefferson in the third round they probably would have pulled the trigger as early as the fifth.
    “His measurables are fine. He’s got the same measurables of everyone that was getting drafted in the third and fourth round,” Haslett said. “There are a lot of guys in that position that didn’t get drafted. There were a million DBs, a million offensive and defensive linemen. A lot of quarterbacks.”
    Haslett isn’t the only guy in his corner. Try the guy in the corner office. Why not? Worley and Bengals president Mike Brown are a couple of Cleveland kids who moved to Cincinnati and always root for the Bengals when they play Browns.
    “I like Worley,” Brown said as he watched him take his first pro steps. “We’ve always liked Ohio State guys. They’ve been good players for us. And good guys. To a man.”
    When Brown grew up in Cleveland, he was the son of Browns head coach Paul Brown idolizing his father’s players. Worley grew up idolizing the players that went to his high school, that parade of blue-chippers that barged through Glenville and Ohio State to the NFL.
    “Ted Ginn Jr., was probably the first. He was one of the guys that always reached back to me in the process,” Worley said. “He was like a big brother to me when I was younger. He’d take me to go work out. Things like that. Cardale Jones and I grew up together. Marshon (Lattimore) and I grew up together and played together our whole life. Since we were seven.”
    His father told him early not to watch teams, but players. That was just fine. He had a problem with the hometown Browns.
    “In my family, half are Browns fans, half are Cincinnati fans,” Worley said. “When they used to play each other I always used to go for Cincinnati just because I knew the Browns sucked. So I was like, ‘I’ll just roll with Cincinnati every time.’”
    This is where he smiled. That seemed to upset the Browns’ half of the family. Chad made it easy to root for Cincy.
    “How could you not love Chad Johnson?” Worley asked of his favorite Bengal. “You could say what you want about him, but once it was time to play football he was a fierce competitor. I always respected that about him.”

    Linebackers coach Jim Haslett had his eye on Worley.
    That gives you an idea where Worley is coming from. Haslett is lining him up at SAM this weekend, but he also slid inside on passing downs. Both of them think he can play all three spots.
    “I’m not trying to do the feeling out process. I’m coming here to compete. That’s why they brought me here,” Worley said. “They didn’t bring guys here to go through the flow. Be the cool guy. At the same time you have to know how to practice. I’m coming here to compete. That’s the only thing that’s on my mind. Compete in different ways. Compete on the field. Compete in the playbook. Leadership role. All that.”
    It doesn’t sound like he’ll have much trouble with the playbook. He’s already got the history book down. Thanks to another Bengals fan, Ohio State coach Urban Meyer.
    “When freshmen come in, especially if they’re from another state, they get the whole Ohio history. You better know that. The team up north. The rivalry. They’ve got to know all that. All the great coaches Ohio State has had. They have to know all that.”
    So he knows why his new stadium has the name. After all, Meyer knows long before Paul Brown coached the Baby Bengals to the 1970 AFC Central Division title, he coached Ohio State to its first national title 28 years before that.
    “I know the impact he’s had on not just Cleveland, not just Cincinnati, but Ohio as a whole,” Worley said. “I’m grateful to be in a state where there’s so much tradition. At this point everywhere I’ve been he’s had an impact. It’s kind of weird to think about it that way. It’s kind of like my grand dad.”
    Now Worley knows he needs a roster spot to get in the history.


    http://www.bengals.com/news/article-...8-71641a1588aa





  6. #16
    Cincy Jungle@CincyJungle 20h20 hours agoMore



    #Bengals center Billy Price cleared to run; already showing signs of being a great leader during rookie minicamp




    https://t.co/0GQWrqHNh8

  7. #17

  8. #18
    A look at the three newest Bengals:
    S Tyrice Beverette, Stony Brook 6-0 203; Age: 23; Hometown, Lakewood, N.J.
    Arrived for last weekend’s rookie minicamp straight from tryout with Jets … Two-time all-league player … Had team-high 96 tackles last season … Ran 4.65 40, jumped 10-feet-2 in broad jump with 36-inch vertical at pro day where he felt he showed he’s more than box safety. THE SKINNY:Of all try-out players Bengals invited last weekend, may have been their highest-rated … They like how physical played on tape and brought along his signature high-energy and high-effort with good movement to earn another look …
    C Brad Lundblade, Oklahoma State 6-3 295; Age: 22; Hometown: Argyle, Texas
    After getting cut by Seattle following last week’s rookie minicamp (as did former Bengals backer Paul Dawson), hooked on for tryout here at last minute and took most of the snaps … True to his M.O. … Walked on before 2015 season, won job and was three-year starter for Cowboys’ high-powered offense … Also has impressive resume off field … Member of NCAA Autonomy Governance Committee as one of only three student-athlete representatives from Big 12 … Fellowship of Christian Athletes speaker … visits local police officers as member of Athletes in Action. THE SKINNY: Four Bengals assistants saw him when they coached in the East-West Shrine Game. He impressed them last weekend playing all three inside spots while picking up things quickly. A tad undersized but they thought he moved well.
    DT Chris Okoye, Ferris State 6-5 325; Age: 21; Hometown: Novi, Mich.
    Invited to 2018 College Gridiron Showcase … earned All-Great Lakes Intercollegiate Athletic Conference last season with 25 total stops … Added two tackles for loss for one of Division II’s top defenses … helped Ferris to fourth straight 11-win season and fourth consecutive playoff … THE SKINNY: Big bodied guy caught attention of coaches on first day … NFL size and strength … Repped 225 pounds 23 times at pro day … Age, size, and strength give him upside at a spot Bengals lack a major-league sized run-stopper …


    http://www.bengals.com/news/article-...7-d9098ea9f51b

  9. #19
       
    Join Date
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bengals1181 View Post
    A look at the three newest Bengals:
    S Tyrice Beverette, Stony Brook 6-0 203; Age: 23; Hometown, Lakewood, N.J.
    Arrived for last weekend’s rookie minicamp straight from tryout with Jets … Two-time all-league player … Had team-high 96 tackles last season … Ran 4.65 40, jumped 10-feet-2 in broad jump with 36-inch vertical at pro day where he felt he showed he’s more than box safety. THE SKINNY:Of all try-out players Bengals invited last weekend, may have been their highest-rated … They like how physical played on tape and brought along his signature high-energy and high-effort with good movement to earn another look …
    C Brad Lundblade, Oklahoma State 6-3 295; Age: 22; Hometown: Argyle, Texas
    After getting cut by Seattle following last week’s rookie minicamp (as did former Bengals backer Paul Dawson), hooked on for tryout here at last minute and took most of the snaps … True to his M.O. … Walked on before 2015 season, won job and was three-year starter for Cowboys’ high-powered offense … Also has impressive resume off field … Member of NCAA Autonomy Governance Committee as one of only three student-athlete representatives from Big 12 … Fellowship of Christian Athletes speaker … visits local police officers as member of Athletes in Action. THE SKINNY: Four Bengals assistants saw him when they coached in the East-West Shrine Game. He impressed them last weekend playing all three inside spots while picking up things quickly. A tad undersized but they thought he moved well.
    DT Chris Okoye, Ferris State 6-5 325; Age: 21; Hometown: Novi, Mich.
    Invited to 2018 College Gridiron Showcase … earned All-Great Lakes Intercollegiate Athletic Conference last season with 25 total stops … Added two tackles for loss for one of Division II’s top defenses … helped Ferris to fourth straight 11-win season and fourth consecutive playoff … THE SKINNY: Big bodied guy caught attention of coaches on first day … NFL size and strength … Repped 225 pounds 23 times at pro day … Age, size, and strength give him upside at a spot Bengals lack a major-league sized run-stopper …


    http://www.bengals.com/news/article-...7-d9098ea9f51b
    It’s a bit wild to me that I couldn’t point to Ferris State on a map of Ferris State, yet even they have a guy who’s 6’5”, 325. Man, this planet has some big effing dudes on it.

  10. #20

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