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Thread: 2019 Reds Thread

  1. #11
    Yay?

  2. #12
    Quote Originally Posted by Bengals1181 View Post
    Yay?
    I think it’s a positive trade. I have seen some people say this could make the Reds a playoff contender but I am not so sure about that. I think the biggest thing is you get Bailey off the team and his contract off the books which was needed. In return, I am sure the Reds are hoping that Alex Wood can replicate what he did in 2017 where he was a really good starting pitcher. If he cannot and it’s likely he won’t, you still get a quality back end of the rotation pitcher that has proven he can get you 9 to 11 wins or give you some decent innings out of the bullpen.

    With Kemp, he is not the gold gove defender he once was but he still has some power in his bat. If he can stay healthy, he is probably a 20 plus HR, 80 plus RBI guy playing at GABP. Could be a good bat to hit behind Votto.

    Puig is the interesting player. He has all the tools to be a great player but has never quite lived up to expectations. He will at least add some entertainment value to the Reds. If he gets off to a really hot start, the Reds should be able to flip him at the trade deadline for a decent prospect. If he has a good year and leaves at the end of the year, the Reds could get a comp pick out of it.

  3. #13
    Quote Originally Posted by BigDawgBengal View Post
    I think it’s a positive trade. I have seen some people say this could make the Reds a playoff contender but I am not so sure about that. I think the biggest thing is you get Bailey off the team and his contract off the books which was needed. In return, I am sure the Reds are hoping that Alex Wood can replicate what he did in 2017 where he was a really good starting pitcher. If he cannot and it’s likely he won’t, you still get a quality back end of the rotation pitcher that has proven he can get you 9 to 11 wins or give you some decent innings out of the bullpen.

    With Kemp, he is not the gold gove defender he once was but he still has some power in his bat. If he can stay healthy, he is probably a 20 plus HR, 80 plus RBI guy playing at GABP. Could be a good bat to hit behind Votto.

    Puig is the interesting player. He has all the tools to be a great player but has never quite lived up to expectations. He will at least add some entertainment value to the Reds. If he gets off to a really hot start, the Reds should be able to flip him at the trade deadline for a decent prospect. If he has a good year and leaves at the end of the year, the Reds could get a comp pick out of it.

    but why would a team who was just in the World Series give up those three players?

  4. #14
    Clearing under the tax to make a run at Bryce Harper. This is an nba style cap move and the Reds s, for once, are smartly benefiting.

  5. #15
    Reds just traded for Sonny Gray and singed him to 3 year extension plus club option for 4th year.

  6. #16
    Traded one of my favorite prospects. Was going to probably end up being blocked by Senzel though. Pretty meh on Gray. At least they’re trying though.

  7. #17
    Reds win!

  8. #18
    Mike Brown Salutes Marty


    Geoff HobsonSENIOR WRITER



    John Minchillo/Copyright 2019 The Associated Press. All rights reserved.
    Bengals president Mike Brown has fond memories of Marty Brennaman's calls.




    Bengals president Mike Brown, still very much the Ohio kid who grew up idolizing Bob Feller as much as Marion Motley in a Cleveland of more than 70 years ago, is still, at heart, a radio guy. He made football his life but baseball one of his few hobbies and on Thursday he reflected on how Marty Brennaman has helped him enjoy it.

    Brown couldn’t listen to Brennaman’s last call Thursday because it came in the middle of a Bengals practice in the heart of Steelers Week. But he heard enough of the eternal Voice of the Reds others to know his town was losing a friend.

    “I, like a lot of people in Cincinnati, feel like he gets to be something of a friend,” Brown said from his golf cart a few fairways from Brennaman’s farewell. “He had what you don’t have in most baseball broadcasters. They call a pitch and then they don’t say anything for about 30 seconds. ‘There’s a foul ball.’ Then silence. He would always interject some kind of conversation that wasn’t always about baseball. It kept you listening. I think it was a way of making the games easier to listen to. It was as if you were at the game with a friend.”

    Brown and Brennaman. Two guys who are the last of a breed. Brown, an NFL owner whose only business is his team. Those 62 guys and 21 coaches out there on the practice field. That’s it. In a league where owners are now accompanied by entourages rivalling the Secret Service and pulled about by their other enterprises, Brown drives himself to work, takes the morning Delta direct to NFL meetings and always keeps his team’s depth chart folded in his shirt pocket. Brennaman is the daily summer radio voice that has stayed with one team through nine presidents and almost as many Hall-of-Famers, of which he is one. He is the last of the Harwells, the Scullys, the Barbers. One of those soothingly familiar sounds to Baby Boomers as much as Generation Xers on life's turbulent march through the milestones.

    And for Depression kids, too. Brown was born the year before Feller threw his first big-league pitch. Their two worlds would collide in Brown’s training camp dorm room at Wilmington College, the one with no air conditioner, and he’d raise the window after dinner and tune in the Reds while reading or going through the roster. Same thing at Georgetown College. Wander into Brown’s room, which did have air conditioning, and Brennaman would come breezing in again while he was watching tape or leafing through a biography thicker than a nose tackle. Or in his car. Or at his house, where he’d have the radio on with the TV picture. Like people of a certain age, a summer sound track means a live baseball game and not a recorded podcast.




    “Having the radio and watching the game on TV is being a notch ahead, so you know what to look for,” Brown said. “For old eyes like mine, that’s an advantage knowing where the ball is going.”

    They’ve had lunch a couple of times, each time son Thom came along, and they hit it off. Why not? Brennaman loved hearing the old stories about Paul Brown’s Cleveland teams and Brown, the self-described batboy “with big ears,” at the Great Lakes Naval Base where some major leaguers played during the war, was impressed with how quickly Brennaman came up with the birthplace of Rapid Robert.

    “I had it, but Marty came right out with it out of the blue when I was halfway through,” Brown said. “He knows his baseball lore.”

    Brown remembers leaving that first lunch and watching Brennaman approached by a flock of fans.

    “They felt as they knew him. He didn’t know them, but they knew him,” Brown said.


    At their next lunch, Brown mentioned the scene and Brennaman said, no, that didn’t happen, but Thom broke in and said, “Dad, you know it happens. That’s the way it is around you.”

    “And I think it is,” Brown said. “He is a Cincinnati figure that is probably better known than any other Cincinnati figure. He has a spot in the hearts of community. I think he did great.”

    Told how much Brennaman enjoyed the lunches and would like to do it again, Brown hoped they could do it again.

    “But,” Brown said, “He’s going to have a new schedule.”

    Even two guys who are the last of a breed have to adjust.



    https://www.bengals.com/news/mike-brown-salutes-marty








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