View Poll Results: Do sideline fights help or hinder?

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  • They make a team stronger.

    0 0%
  • They hurt team morale.

    1 50.00%
  • No big deal, it is what it is.

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Thread: Sideline screaming, yelling, and the correlation to team morale.

  1. #1
       
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    Sideline screaming, yelling, and the correlation to team morale.

    As we know, former 49ers coach Mike Singletary got into a sideline row with his former quarterback Troy Smith yesterday on the sidelines. We have all seen this before, a player and a coach getting a bit heated with each other and all of a sudden the team is down by 7 points and emotions take over. Most of the time this goes away after a day or two, but it seems like this is a problem with a few guys who have been fired or are in the hot seat this year. I think of hearing about Brad Childress and his spats with Percy Harvin, Randy Moss, and the other half of the locker room. I think about Tom Coughlin tearing into Tom Dodge after his directional punt that didn't go directional enough last week. I think about Jeff Fisher and his on again off again relationship with Vince Young, and I think about the guys that just kind of stood there like Wade Phillips and Josh McDaniels.

    The main point of this article is address what really happens during these sideline tiffs, and I thought a great person to ask would be our Ephraim, due to your proximity of time with many of the current guys as teammates or coaches. When one of these rows happens, is it the elephant in the room for a few weeks? Does it blow over real quick just like when you argue with your brother? Does it get overplayed/underplayed by the media (I assume overplayed)?

    I know every fight has a lot to do with who is arguing and who is more well respected and liked. In Sing's case, he had a lame duck feel about him (which is a shame, because I would run through a brick wall for that guy), which may have led to a little more vocalization of feelings. Maybe Troy Smith isn't used to being "the guy", and had a mini-meltdown. I don't know the specifics, and I can only hypothesize, but I just wanted to get some type of insight from Ephraim, Cris, Phil, the Turkster, or Dave. Even a media perspective from Josina and John would be a plus.
    Last edited by FessJL0861; 12-27-2010 at 08:48 PM.
    "Whenever you find yourself on the side of the majority, it is time to pause and reflect." - Mark Twain

  2. #2
    Praise in public. Criticize in private.

    Dust-ups are for the locker room, not the sidelines. At least not these days. Too many cameras in the world.
    Screw you guys, I'm going home.

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    I understand that most of that stuff needs to wait, but some things need to be addressed immediately. A good arse-chewing never hurt anybody. They should be primarily between QB and QB coach/ O-Coordinator IMO. Those are dust ups that I think can help, not hurt.
    "Whenever you find yourself on the side of the majority, it is time to pause and reflect." - Mark Twain

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    In the short term, a yell might help. But it always ends up creating more problems than its worth. Pro Athletes are hyper competitive by nature, and you don't want to distract that focus away from the enemy and towards one of your men.

    There is a difference when the haranguing id done by a peer who is given the prerogative by the team as a whole. A team captain, as it were. Even so, he has to be careful of not embarrasing the man amongst those who don't share the "code".

    GoBig has it right regarding someone in a position of authority. You don't emasculate one of your men unless you are willing to get rid of him.
    “Never ascribe to malice that which can adequately be explained by incompetence.”
    ― Napoleon Bonaparte

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    I don't know whether it works, though I suspect it's a case by case basis. Most players are actually young guys who have been brought up in that atmosphere and are more likely than they would be anywhere else to put up with it. It's possible they might improve because of it. I wouldn't, but I'm not one of them. I think it's ugly. This shouldn
    t be good:

    http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2200/...5092d48233.jpg

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    HA! What a picture. When I was playing back in the day, I remember getting a few reamings as I came off the sideline. All that did was make me want to fix the problem. Granted, I would have run through a brick wall for those coaches. If it were a guy I didn't like though, yeah, it would be on. Most good coaches know they don't have to get ugly to get their point across. The exception to the rule are the authoritarian guys we hear about when the coaching carousel stats up. Dallas seems to switch between "players coach", and "authoritarian" a lot. So do the New York Giants and San Diego. Marty Schottenheimer is a sleeper free agent coach this offseason. I would love to have him coach my team, but I have seen him yell at a few guys on the sideline.
    "Whenever you find yourself on the side of the majority, it is time to pause and reflect." - Mark Twain

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    The difference is that these guys are getting payed. And they also are an asset that is hard to replace. A coach of a winning team cvan get away with it. Not the coach of a loosing team.
    “Never ascribe to malice that which can adequately be explained by incompetence.”
    ― Napoleon Bonaparte

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    Quote Originally Posted by iwatt View Post
    The difference is that these guys are getting payed. And they also are an asset that is hard to replace. A coach of a winning team cvan get away with it. Not the coach of a loosing team.
    Yep. Winning fixes everything, and losing screws it up. See: Coughlin, Tom
    "Whenever you find yourself on the side of the majority, it is time to pause and reflect." - Mark Twain

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    Ever wonder why Bob Knight's players didn't become excellent, or in most cases even good, pros? I think this sort of thing had an effect. His public humiliations, while effective in the short term, stunted the maturation of the players, preventing them from becoming able to figure things out and solve problems on their own. He created risk-averse players who would one day never take a chance to win a game, or even a possession. He cfreated a lot of tall Followers.

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    Quote Originally Posted by ScottDCP View Post
    Ever wonder why Bob Knight's players didn't become excellent, or in most cases even good, pros? I think this sort of thing had an effect. His public humiliations, while effective in the short term, stunted the maturation of the players, preventing them from becoming able to figure things out and solve problems on their own. He created risk-averse players who would one day never take a chance to win a game, or even a possession. He cfreated a lot of tall Followers.
    I could argue the opposite. He had Isiah Thomas as his one Hall of Famer. He also had a bunch of role players, and never really recruited the one and done guy. Knight himself has come out and said as much. In comparison, look at John Chaney, Jerry Tarkanian, Roy Williams, Bill Self, or Jim Boeheim. They all had one or two future NBA stars, but mostly ended up with amazing role players who floundered a bit in the pros. John Calipari puts stars in the NBA and doesn't yell, but his programs also suffer the consequences of his shady recruiting practices. I still see no correlation between yelling and future success.

    Disclaimer: I am from Indiana, and Bob Knight is the patron saint of IU Basketball. And I am a huge homer...
    "Whenever you find yourself on the side of the majority, it is time to pause and reflect." - Mark Twain

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